Available Balance
Avoid Eating Too Much During Fiestas/Celebrations
May 14, 2017
4
20140323_095958

In the Philippines, there are so many celebrations like fiestas or feasts of Patron Saints. Many of them are observed during the dry season months of May and June when children/students are on vacation from schools.

During these celebrations, there are so much food offered to the guests. Many of our relatives prepare food for us, and for their other guests. Just like today, we went to our siblings houses to “bond” with them. The fiesta of St. Isodore, the Farmer (San Isidro) will be tomorrow, May 15, but they prepared food for us because many of our relatives have offices/works tomorrow, it being a Monday.

My husband and I were laughing as my older sister invited us to eat lunch. There were so much food, like big crabs cooked in coconut milk, shrimps with chili and butter, fish, pork barbecue, chicken, watermelon, and other fruits.

We just ate a shrimp, a slice of chicken and a crab’s claw, then a very small amount of rice. Then a small slice of watermelon. There was also a big can of native ice cream, with lots of cheese and jackfruit flavor. They enjoyed eating the ice cream, so I was tempted to have a scoop, just to taste it. But after that, I felt guilty, thinking that my blood sugar could rise above the normal level.

Aside from drinking a lot of water, I will walk for some 30 minutes tomorrow to “burn” the excess sugar!

Do you have such an experience when you cannot refuse to partake of the food, but you are worrying about your health? It takes a lot of discipline or self-control to refuse such offers.

It is really hard to be so concerned about health. But it is good to be cautious than suffer the consequences. Though I am not yet diabetic, I am keeping my sugar level below the borderline to be healthy and I do not want to take synthetic drugs or drug maintenance for some lifestyle diseases like diabetes.

Genetically Modified Foods; No Thanks
May 14, 2017
6
download

I was in the supermarket this morning.  They had just opened this new store and I, a long time customer came to visit.

I happened to be talking to the owner about lots of topics, as I was shopping.  I passed all the ‘pretty’ vegetables and went looking for the ones that seemed ‘handicapped’. The ones that were twisted or squished or lumpy, the kind that wouldn’t win the most beautiful tomato contest.

She had to laugh; “I do the same thing.”

I don’t know why, but I’m afraid of genetically modified vegetables.   I’m sure if I did research they are not as bad as I fear… but when I see a tomato as big as a cantaloupe, or a sweet pepper bigger than both my fists together… no.

I saw a bag of carrots.  Every one of them was about one foot long and an inch and one half in diameter as if they were clones.   I didn’t touch them.  I picked out the ones that looked like they had suffered; bent, a little twisted, sort of lumpy.

Most of the vegetables we get from America are genetically modified.  Those we get here are usually natural with maybe some bat poo as fertiliser.

Maybe Genetically modified foods are safe, maybe healthy.  I don’t know.  But they don’t look right to me.  They don’t look like real food.  They look like the wax vegetables my mother had on the table as decoration.

I’m not used to these kinds of vegetables.   I have grown tomatos on a bush and they are like the size of ping pong balls.   I’ve pulled up cucumbers from the ground and each one is different.

When I see a pile of vegetables that all look the same I don’t get the feeling I’m looking at edible food.

I don’t know how you feel about it, but; I don’t want to eat them.

 

You Must Eat According to Your Conscience
May 13, 2017
0
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During the time of 1st century Christianity, when Gentiles were being accepted into the faith along with Jews who had accepted the gospel message, the Jews having become accustomed to their strict dietary laws and the Gentiles have their own “food ways”, a question came up about whether or not it was OK to eat certain foods.  One must eat!  But one does not want to commit a sin to eat.  It was a deeply religious matter for the faithful.

 

The matter was settled and the Christians were given instructions on what to do when food was offered to them. In a nutshell, ask God’s blessing for the food you’re about to receive, eat it, and ask no questions for your conscience sake.

 

Of course it’s not saying that we should not question what goes in our body. That would be ridiculous. Take the scripture in its context.

 

The advice from the apostles can be quickly summed up as follows:

  • All food comes from the one true God. It’s meant to be a blessing, to nourish and strengthen our bodies. Thank Him and eat it!

 

That being said, having quickly perused a list of “bizarre ingredients” that are used in preparing certain foods, I’m thinking:

Uuuggg!! Wish I had never seen this article because now it’s in my conscience. Sand in my chili???!!! Duck feathers in my apple pie??!!! I’m never going to look at certain foods the same way any more.”

 

10 Bizarre Ingredients in Delicious Foods

 

As if it wasn’t bad enough when I found out about the bull’s penis being prepared in a soup. Not meaning to offend anyone, because it was said this is considered a very exotic dish; however, if it were served to me, you would have to not tell me what is was, until I had finished eating.

 

You do not understand. I am a soup lover!! I love soups so much that I think people should have soup parties! Invite friends and family. Tell each guest to bring their favorite pot of soup. You supply the bread, rolls, butter, desserts and drinks. Make sure you plan the party for a really cold winter’s night. So! A soup with the main ingredient being penis and testicles? For me?  According to my conscience?  It’s too bizarre.  We all have our cultural differences and when it comes to food, most of us can see those differences very plainly.  It’s not a bad thing.  It’s just a different thing.

 

When it comes eating, I’m just not into – what in my mind would be viewed as “bizarre foods”. That’s why I could never watch that food show with Andrew Zimmern.  My conscience simply would not allow it.

 

Bizarre Foods Full Episodes

 

This list (below), although they use the word “bizarre” in the title – this is not my idea of bizarre foods. More like fun foods. Anybody want to try some Mountain Dew Cheetos?

 

10 bizarre foods you’ll only see in Japan

 
“I love soup” : glitter-graphics.com

Do we drink or not drink water during meals?
May 11, 2017
2
IMG_6829

We all know how important hydration is for our health. We read that water accounts for about 2/3 of our weight and that every cell, tissue and body of our body needs water to function properly. Water is necessary for good thermoregulation, joint lubrication and elimination of waste substances from the body.

Water directly affects the elasticity of the muscle fibers, which is one of the most important conditions for complete workouts, with no perceptions and stretches that often keep us away from the hall, track and more.
The water in our body is not a constant quantity – it is constantly spent, so regular recovery is a must for maintaining good health.

But is it good to drink water while we eat?

Does it help or harm our digestion? As always, opinions here are divided into two camps. There are some basic amounts, generally accepted for people with reduced mobility, and for training over amateur level in speed, power and other sports.
Our whole digestive system works efficiently only if it is well “crushed” with water. But should we constantly “flood” it and prevent excessive water intake from its work?
We will not stop the device and the action of digestion, because it should be clear to everyone.

In this paper, we will only look at the arguments “for” and “against” taking extra water during meals.

Against” drinking water while eating

The co-administration of large amounts of water and food, especially cold water, could reduce the levels of acidity in the stomach and the bile juice. This, in turn, slows down the process of digestion and can cause stomach pains and ailments.

About” drinking water while eating

Some doctors say that drinking water during a meal not only does not interfere with digestion but even aids it by further liquefying food and making it easier to digest. As we know, our stomach is able to process only liquid food, not solid, that is why we have to chew it until we liar it before we swallow it.
So, who is right?
And here, as in many other cases, the truth is somewhere in the middle. Water is undoubtedly vital to every process in our body, and digestion is no exception. Here are some simple rules to keep you in order not to suffer neither the digestion nor the hydration of the body:

– Hydrate fully during the day – take adequate fluids throughout the day so you do not have to swallow large amounts of water with your food. A basic reference could be the following: the personal weight divided by two and multiplied in ounces. For a 90 kg athlete, 45×28.35 = about 1.3 liters per day. This is the recommended and, according to others, the absolute minimum amount accepted within one day. Of course, active trainees need a lot higher receptions, everything is strictly indwelling and often depends on our everyday life, and for athletes – from the stage of preparation, nutrition plan, etc.

– Drink water before meals – if you ever you are hungry during the food or immediately after meals, it may be a sign that you do not take enough water during the day. Drink a glass of water 20-30 minutes before you sit down at the table to reduce their thirst afterwards.
– Drink in small sips – if you were to take water while you eat, do it in tiny sips, several times during the meal. Do not drink large amounts of water at a time during or immediately after a meal.
– Prefer warm water rather than cold – so will greatly facilitate the work of the stomach. Poet sip tea or homemade broth can even help your digestion. This is of particular benefit to those whose patency of the intestine is decreased and suffer from constipation.

– Seek the middle way – nobody needs extremes even in drinking water. Drink enough, but not hyperhydrate. In an effort to stay well hydrated, many people drink of water, which even taken on an empty stomach, limiting the activity of many systems, including the digestive. Inefficient digestion leads to accumulation of toxic substances in the organism, no matter how healthy food that assume.
see also Which diets to avoid

– If you practice power-speed sports that determine short, strenuous activities (athletics, wrestling, weightlifting), take small amounts of water between training approaches (series stretches rounds) to keep your body hydrated without leads to discomfort, prevent a given exercise.
– In case of prolonged low-intensity stress (long crosses or biking, hiking, etc.). Add a pinch of natural salt in a bottle with water. Do not overdo it, determine the amount of salt according to taste of water – it must not become salty.
– Choose water at approximately neutral pH, as quite statistics and studies agree in figure 7 (6.5-8.5).

– Start and end your day with 2-3 glasses of tepid to warm water.

Do you know how to make zoodle soup very well?????
May 11, 2017
0
TMPDOODLE1494507997688

Zucchini noodles, also known as zoodles, are a great alternative to wheat-based pasta. Whether you’re following a gluten-free diet or want to drastically reduce your carbohydrate intake, zoodles provide a tasty solution when you want to enjoy classic dishes like pasta or soup. To get zoodles, you will typically need to make them yourself using either a spiralizer, julienne peeler or mandoline. Once you’ve got your zoodles, you can use them to create many different kinds of zoodle-based soups.

Ingredients
Edit
Chicken Zoodle Soup
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup diced onions
1 cup diced celery
3 cloves garlic, minced
5 (14.5 ounce) cans low-sodium chicken broth
3/4 pound cooked chicken breast, cut into bite sized pieces
1 cup sliced carrots
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1 pinch dried thyme (optional)
Salt and ground black pepper to taste
3 zucchini squash, cut into “zoodles”
Serves 6

Part One of Three:
Making Zucchini Noodles
Edit

1
Use a spiralizer. This is the preferred tool for many people because it’s the fastest and easiest to operate. Unfortunately, it’s also the largest and most expensive. To use it, simply wash your zucchini and slice the ends off. Place the zucchini next to the blade and spin. The zucchini will be reduced to thin spiral slices in less than ten seconds. [1]
You can buy spiralizers in stores that sell cookware and small kitchen appliances. You can also order one online.
If you’re on a budget or have little kitchen space to spare, consider buying a handheld spiralizer. They are much cheaper, and while the quality of the zoodles won’t be as consistent, it will get the job done.

2
Try a julienne peeler. Julienne peelers are small and relatively cheap, but it will take a bit longer to get zucchini noodles when you use one. It will create thinner noodles than the spiralizer, so if you like very delicate noodles, you may prefer using this tool. Wash your zucchini and cut the ends off. Hold the vegetable against the blade and rotate it to create the zoodles.[2]
Operate with caution, since you can easily cut yourself with a julienne peeler if you aren’t paying attention.
You can buy one of these tools at any store that sells kitchen utensils.

3
Use a mandoline. Mandolines slice zucchini quickly and easily, but they are fairly large. They’re also extremely sharp, so be careful and always use the safety guard or a cut-resistant glove. Slice the ends off of your rinsed zucchini and nestle the vegetable into the plastic holder. Push the plastic holder from one end of the mandolin to the other repeatedly. The sharp blade will do the rest of the work.[3]
You can buy mandolines at most stores that sell kitchen utensils.
Don’t underestimate the sharpness of a mandoline! Use caution.Look for pre-packaged zoodles. Some grocery stores are starting to carry pre-packaged zoodles, especially health-oriented establishments like Whole Foods. While most people still tend to make zoodles themselves using one of their kitchen tools, pre-packaged zoodles may be a good option for you if you want to test out the taste before committing to buying an expensive tool.[4]
Check the noodle section for pre-packaged zoodles. In some cases, you may find them in the refrigerated section of the produce area.
Advertisement
Part Two of Three:
Cooking Zucchini Noodles
Edit

1
Leave them raw. If you prefer noodles that are crisp, with an al dente texture, don’t cook your zoodles at all! Simply combine them with the warm ingredients (whatever broth or soup you intend to eat them with) and serve them immediately. The heat from the broth will quickly heat up the thin slices of zucchini and your zoodles will have a similar quality to al dente noodles.[5]
This is by far the easiest and most versatile way to make any kind of zoodle soup that you wish. Simply prepare the broth you want and ladle it over your zoodles.

2
Microwave them. For those who prefer noodles that are softer than al dente, this technique is quick and easy. Place your zoodles in a microwave safe dish. Cook them for about one minute. If you’re cooking a big pile of zoodles, you may need to cook them for longer. Do so in 30 second increments so that the zoodles aren’t overcooked. Once heated, combine them with your broth or soup.[6]

3
Sauté the zoodles. If you don’t have a microwave or prefer to use your stovetop, sautéing your zoodles is a great option. Add one tablespoon of olive oil to a pan. Heat it up, add the zoodles and sauté them for 1-2 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove them from heat, combine them with your broth and serve immediately.

4
Boil them. This will create the softest noodle. Bring a pot of water to boil, add the zoodles and let them boil in the water for about one minute. Remove them from heat and drain them with a colander, exactly as you would with traditional noodles. Combine them with the broth or soup of your choice and serve.[7]
Advertisement
Part Three of Three:
Making Chicken Zoodle Soup
Edit

1
Make your zoodles. Rinse off the three zucchini. Slice both ends off of each one. Use your spiralizer, julienne peeler or mandoline to reduce the zucchini to a pile of zoodles. Divide the zoodles into six bowls. Set these aside for now.[8]
If you prefer, you can remove the skin from the zucchini before creating the zoodles. However, most people leave the skin on.
Sauté the onion, celery, and garlic in a large pot. Add olive oil to a large pot and heat it up over medium-high heat. Add the diced onion and celery to the pot, as well as the minced garlic. Sauté them together for about five minutes, until they are tender and the onions appear to be slightly translucent.[9]

3
Add the broth, carrots, chicken and spices to the pot. Pour the chicken broth into the pot and stir to incorporate the ingredients. Then add the sliced carrots and chicken. Stir again. Measure out and add the basil, oregano and thyme. Add salt and pepper to taste.[10]

4
Simmer for 20 minutes. Stir the mixture well to incorporate all ingredients. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer the soup at this heat for about 20 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender.[11]

5
Ladle the broth over the zoodles and serve. Remove the soup from the heat once the vegetables are tender. Taste the broth and add more salt and pepper, if desired. Carefully ladle the soup mixture over each bowl of zoodles. Serve the soup immediately.[12]

6
Finished.

Do you know how to make zoodle soup very well?????
May 11, 2017
0
TMPDOODLE1494507997688

Zucchini noodles, also known as zoodles, are a great alternative to wheat-based pasta. Whether you’re following a gluten-free diet or want to drastically reduce your carbohydrate intake, zoodles provide a tasty solution when you want to enjoy classic dishes like pasta or soup. To get zoodles, you will typically need to make them yourself using either a spiralizer, julienne peeler or mandoline. Once you’ve got your zoodles, you can use them to create many different kinds of zoodle-based soups.

Ingredients
Edit
Chicken Zoodle Soup
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup diced onions
1 cup diced celery
3 cloves garlic, minced
5 (14.5 ounce) cans low-sodium chicken broth
3/4 pound cooked chicken breast, cut into bite sized pieces
1 cup sliced carrots
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1 pinch dried thyme (optional)
Salt and ground black pepper to taste
3 zucchini squash, cut into “zoodles”
Serves 6

Part One of Three:
Making Zucchini Noodles
Edit

1
Use a spiralizer. This is the preferred tool for many people because it’s the fastest and easiest to operate. Unfortunately, it’s also the largest and most expensive. To use it, simply wash your zucchini and slice the ends off. Place the zucchini next to the blade and spin. The zucchini will be reduced to thin spiral slices in less than ten seconds. [1]
You can buy spiralizers in stores that sell cookware and small kitchen appliances. You can also order one online.
If you’re on a budget or have little kitchen space to spare, consider buying a handheld spiralizer. They are much cheaper, and while the quality of the zoodles won’t be as consistent, it will get the job done.

2
Try a julienne peeler. Julienne peelers are small and relatively cheap, but it will take a bit longer to get zucchini noodles when you use one. It will create thinner noodles than the spiralizer, so if you like very delicate noodles, you may prefer using this tool. Wash your zucchini and cut the ends off. Hold the vegetable against the blade and rotate it to create the zoodles.[2]
Operate with caution, since you can easily cut yourself with a julienne peeler if you aren’t paying attention.
You can buy one of these tools at any store that sells kitchen utensils.

3
Use a mandoline. Mandolines slice zucchini quickly and easily, but they are fairly large. They’re also extremely sharp, so be careful and always use the safety guard or a cut-resistant glove. Slice the ends off of your rinsed zucchini and nestle the vegetable into the plastic holder. Push the plastic holder from one end of the mandolin to the other repeatedly. The sharp blade will do the rest of the work.[3]
You can buy mandolines at most stores that sell kitchen utensils.
Don’t underestimate the sharpness of a mandoline! Use caution.Look for pre-packaged zoodles. Some grocery stores are starting to carry pre-packaged zoodles, especially health-oriented establishments like Whole Foods. While most people still tend to make zoodles themselves using one of their kitchen tools, pre-packaged zoodles may be a good option for you if you want to test out the taste before committing to buying an expensive tool.[4]
Check the noodle section for pre-packaged zoodles. In some cases, you may find them in the refrigerated section of the produce area.
Advertisement
Part Two of Three:
Cooking Zucchini Noodles
Edit

1
Leave them raw. If you prefer noodles that are crisp, with an al dente texture, don’t cook your zoodles at all! Simply combine them with the warm ingredients (whatever broth or soup you intend to eat them with) and serve them immediately. The heat from the broth will quickly heat up the thin slices of zucchini and your zoodles will have a similar quality to al dente noodles.[5]
This is by far the easiest and most versatile way to make any kind of zoodle soup that you wish. Simply prepare the broth you want and ladle it over your zoodles.

2
Microwave them. For those who prefer noodles that are softer than al dente, this technique is quick and easy. Place your zoodles in a microwave safe dish. Cook them for about one minute. If you’re cooking a big pile of zoodles, you may need to cook them for longer. Do so in 30 second increments so that the zoodles aren’t overcooked. Once heated, combine them with your broth or soup.[6]

3
Sauté the zoodles. If you don’t have a microwave or prefer to use your stovetop, sautéing your zoodles is a great option. Add one tablespoon of olive oil to a pan. Heat it up, add the zoodles and sauté them for 1-2 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove them from heat, combine them with your broth and serve immediately.

4
Boil them. This will create the softest noodle. Bring a pot of water to boil, add the zoodles and let them boil in the water for about one minute. Remove them from heat and drain them with a colander, exactly as you would with traditional noodles. Combine them with the broth or soup of your choice and serve.[7]
Advertisement
Part Three of Three:
Making Chicken Zoodle Soup
Edit

1
Make your zoodles. Rinse off the three zucchini. Slice both ends off of each one. Use your spiralizer, julienne peeler or mandoline to reduce the zucchini to a pile of zoodles. Divide the zoodles into six bowls. Set these aside for now.[8]
If you prefer, you can remove the skin from the zucchini before creating the zoodles. However, most people leave the skin on.
Sauté the onion, celery, and garlic in a large pot. Add olive oil to a large pot and heat it up over medium-high heat. Add the diced onion and celery to the pot, as well as the minced garlic. Sauté them together for about five minutes, until they are tender and the onions appear to be slightly translucent.[9]

3
Add the broth, carrots, chicken and spices to the pot. Pour the chicken broth into the pot and stir to incorporate the ingredients. Then add the sliced carrots and chicken. Stir again. Measure out and add the basil, oregano and thyme. Add salt and pepper to taste.[10]

4
Simmer for 20 minutes. Stir the mixture well to incorporate all ingredients. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer the soup at this heat for about 20 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender.[11]

5
Ladle the broth over the zoodles and serve. Remove the soup from the heat once the vegetables are tender. Taste the broth and add more salt and pepper, if desired. Carefully ladle the soup mixture over each bowl of zoodles. Serve the soup immediately.[12]

6
Finished.

Do you know how to make zoodle soup very well?????
May 11, 2017
0
TMPDOODLE1494507997688

Zucchini noodles, also known as zoodles, are a great alternative to wheat-based pasta. Whether you’re following a gluten-free diet or want to drastically reduce your carbohydrate intake, zoodles provide a tasty solution when you want to enjoy classic dishes like pasta or soup. To get zoodles, you will typically need to make them yourself using either a spiralizer, julienne peeler or mandoline. Once you’ve got your zoodles, you can use them to create many different kinds of zoodle-based soups.

Ingredients
Edit
Chicken Zoodle Soup
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup diced onions
1 cup diced celery
3 cloves garlic, minced
5 (14.5 ounce) cans low-sodium chicken broth
3/4 pound cooked chicken breast, cut into bite sized pieces
1 cup sliced carrots
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1 pinch dried thyme (optional)
Salt and ground black pepper to taste
3 zucchini squash, cut into “zoodles”
Serves 6

Part One of Three:
Making Zucchini Noodles
Edit

1
Use a spiralizer. This is the preferred tool for many people because it’s the fastest and easiest to operate. Unfortunately, it’s also the largest and most expensive. To use it, simply wash your zucchini and slice the ends off. Place the zucchini next to the blade and spin. The zucchini will be reduced to thin spiral slices in less than ten seconds. [1]
You can buy spiralizers in stores that sell cookware and small kitchen appliances. You can also order one online.
If you’re on a budget or have little kitchen space to spare, consider buying a handheld spiralizer. They are much cheaper, and while the quality of the zoodles won’t be as consistent, it will get the job done.

2
Try a julienne peeler. Julienne peelers are small and relatively cheap, but it will take a bit longer to get zucchini noodles when you use one. It will create thinner noodles than the spiralizer, so if you like very delicate noodles, you may prefer using this tool. Wash your zucchini and cut the ends off. Hold the vegetable against the blade and rotate it to create the zoodles.[2]
Operate with caution, since you can easily cut yourself with a julienne peeler if you aren’t paying attention.
You can buy one of these tools at any store that sells kitchen utensils.

3
Use a mandoline. Mandolines slice zucchini quickly and easily, but they are fairly large. They’re also extremely sharp, so be careful and always use the safety guard or a cut-resistant glove. Slice the ends off of your rinsed zucchini and nestle the vegetable into the plastic holder. Push the plastic holder from one end of the mandolin to the other repeatedly. The sharp blade will do the rest of the work.[3]
You can buy mandolines at most stores that sell kitchen utensils.
Don’t underestimate the sharpness of a mandoline! Use caution.Look for pre-packaged zoodles. Some grocery stores are starting to carry pre-packaged zoodles, especially health-oriented establishments like Whole Foods. While most people still tend to make zoodles themselves using one of their kitchen tools, pre-packaged zoodles may be a good option for you if you want to test out the taste before committing to buying an expensive tool.[4]
Check the noodle section for pre-packaged zoodles. In some cases, you may find them in the refrigerated section of the produce area.
Advertisement
Part Two of Three:
Cooking Zucchini Noodles
Edit

1
Leave them raw. If you prefer noodles that are crisp, with an al dente texture, don’t cook your zoodles at all! Simply combine them with the warm ingredients (whatever broth or soup you intend to eat them with) and serve them immediately. The heat from the broth will quickly heat up the thin slices of zucchini and your zoodles will have a similar quality to al dente noodles.[5]
This is by far the easiest and most versatile way to make any kind of zoodle soup that you wish. Simply prepare the broth you want and ladle it over your zoodles.

2
Microwave them. For those who prefer noodles that are softer than al dente, this technique is quick and easy. Place your zoodles in a microwave safe dish. Cook them for about one minute. If you’re cooking a big pile of zoodles, you may need to cook them for longer. Do so in 30 second increments so that the zoodles aren’t overcooked. Once heated, combine them with your broth or soup.[6]

3
Sauté the zoodles. If you don’t have a microwave or prefer to use your stovetop, sautéing your zoodles is a great option. Add one tablespoon of olive oil to a pan. Heat it up, add the zoodles and sauté them for 1-2 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove them from heat, combine them with your broth and serve immediately.

4
Boil them. This will create the softest noodle. Bring a pot of water to boil, add the zoodles and let them boil in the water for about one minute. Remove them from heat and drain them with a colander, exactly as you would with traditional noodles. Combine them with the broth or soup of your choice and serve.[7]
Advertisement
Part Three of Three:
Making Chicken Zoodle Soup
Edit

1
Make your zoodles. Rinse off the three zucchini. Slice both ends off of each one. Use your spiralizer, julienne peeler or mandoline to reduce the zucchini to a pile of zoodles. Divide the zoodles into six bowls. Set these aside for now.[8]
If you prefer, you can remove the skin from the zucchini before creating the zoodles. However, most people leave the skin on.
Sauté the onion, celery, and garlic in a large pot. Add olive oil to a large pot and heat it up over medium-high heat. Add the diced onion and celery to the pot, as well as the minced garlic. Sauté them together for about five minutes, until they are tender and the onions appear to be slightly translucent.[9]

3
Add the broth, carrots, chicken and spices to the pot. Pour the chicken broth into the pot and stir to incorporate the ingredients. Then add the sliced carrots and chicken. Stir again. Measure out and add the basil, oregano and thyme. Add salt and pepper to taste.[10]

4
Simmer for 20 minutes. Stir the mixture well to incorporate all ingredients. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer the soup at this heat for about 20 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender.[11]

5
Ladle the broth over the zoodles and serve. Remove the soup from the heat once the vegetables are tender. Taste the broth and add more salt and pepper, if desired. Carefully ladle the soup mixture over each bowl of zoodles. Serve the soup immediately.[12]

6
Finished.

Eat healthy at a buffet
May 11, 2017
0
TMPDOODLE1494505956008

Eating at a buffet is a great way to try new dishes and enjoy a great meal with friends, colleagues, or family. With so many food choices and the option to go back for seconds or thirds, it can be tricky to make healthy decisions. Next time you are at a conference, a wedding, or having dinner with friends at a buffet-style restaurant, take the time to plan ahead and avoid unhealthy, high-calorie dishes. If you survey the buffet, select nutrient-rich foods, and commit to practicing portion control, you can enjoy a healthy meal at a buffet.

Part One of Three:
Surveying the Area
Edit

1
Find a table far away from the buffet. The average person makes three trips to a buffet, but if you sit further away, you are less likely to get up and go back for more servings.[1] If you are dining at a buffet-style restaurant, ask the hostess if you can be seated far away from the buffet table. While at a wedding reception or an event that has open-seating, choose a table that is on the opposite side of the room from the buffet stations.

2
Keep your back toward the buffet. If sitting far away from the buffet is not an option, try to seat yourself facing the opposite direction. If you cannot see the carving table or the dessert section of a buffet, you may be less enticed by the array of foods available.[2] Keeping your back to the food can be an effective way to prevent you from getting up for another serving and to curb your cravings.[3]

3
Look over the entire buffet before filling your plate. Before you grab a plate and hop in the buffet line, take a few minutes to scan the entire buffet to review your options. Knowing what is available ahead of time will help stifle the urge to fill your plate with samples and small bites of every dish that looks appealing.[4]
As you look over the buffet, notice where everything is located. Look for the servings of vegetables and fruits first, and then concentrate on adding a lean animal-based or plant-based protein.
Next, think about what whole grains are available, like steamed brown rice, quinoa, or whole wheat pasta.
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Part Two of Three:
Controlling Your Portions
Edit

1
Decide how much to eat before you look at the buffet. Your eyes may be bigger than your stomach, so consider how much you would like to eat before glancing at the options. Decide how many times you will permit yourself to visit the buffet. Craft a plan and commit to it before hopping in line.
Perhaps you will allow yourself to have a small starter, one healthy plate, and a small dessert, or perhaps you would like to have two moderately sized plates for dinner.

2
Imagine your plate is divided in quadrants. When you begin to fill up your plate at a buffet, imagine that the plate is divided into four sections. This will help you visualize what a healthy meal should look like. One half of your plate should be reserved for vegetables and fruits, one quarter of the plate should contain a lean protein, and the last quadrant is reserved for whole grains.[5]

3
Fill your plate with vegetables and fruits. Focus on filling about half or even three-fourths of these quadrants with vegetables and fruits.[6] Try to fill up on low-calorie, nutrient-rich vegetables and fruits to control your calorie intake while fueling your body.[7]

4
Portion out proteins. Scan the buffet and look for healthy, lean proteins such as fish, turkey, or chicken. Plan to limit your red meat intake, and avoid processed meats, bacon, and cold cuts.[8] To control your portion sizes, grab a piece of protein that is similar in size to a stacked deck of cards.[9] This should fill about one quadrant of your plate.

5
Eat a variety of whole grains. Look for whole grains like quinoa, whole wheat pasta, or brown rice to fill up the last quadrant of your plate. Avoid processed grains like white rice, white pasta, and white bread.[10] This should fill up the last quadrant of your plate, and should be similar to the size of a hockey puck.
Start your meal with a cup of soup or a small salad. Enjoy a low-calorie soup or small salad at the beginning of your meal to satiate your hunger and help you control your calorie intake for the rest of the meal.[12] Soups like vegetable soup and broth-based soups are low in calories, and a small salad with fresh, raw vegetables provides a nutrient-dense starter.
Avoid cream-based soups like clam chowder or lobster bisque, which can pack a lot of calories and fat. Visit the soup station at a buffet and grab a cup of tomato puree soup or an egg-drop soup.
If there is a salad bar available, look for dark, leafy greens to serve as your base. Add raw or steamed vegetables like broccoli or peas, and avoid adding cheeses, croutons, and heavy, creamy salad dressings.
Head back to your table and enjoy your starter before plating your main entrée.

2
Opt for grilled, steamed, or broiled dishes. Skip the fried chicken legs or fish and chips at a buffet. Choose a healthier grilled chicken breast seasoned with herbs or fish that has been broiled with vegetables. At a Chinese buffet, skip the fried vegetables and load up on steamed broccoli, snow peas, and carrots. Avoid piling your plate with noodles or pasta dishes that have been pan-fried or stir-fried.
Fried foods absorb a lot of calories and fat from the hot oil. Over time, consuming them can increase your weight and risk for diseases.
Grilled, baked, and broiled dishes are lower in fat and calories, and they retain much of their nutritional content during cooking.[13]

3
Avoid dishes covered in marinades, heavy sauces, and salad dressings. Marinades, salad dressings, and heavy or syrupy sauces can be deceivingly high in calories, fat, sodium, and added sugars.[14] Look for dishes that are seasoned with herbs and mixed with steamed vegetables, and avoid salads that are already coated with dressing.
A cup of creamy pasta carbonara, for example, can contain almost 400 calories and over 400 milligrams of sodium.[15] Look for a pasta dish that is lightly coated with a tomato-based sauce instead.
A tablespoon or 15 milliliters (1 fl oz) of ranch dressing can contain around 16 grams of fat and 143 calories.[16] Select a vinaigrette dressing or drizzle a small amount of extra virgin olive oil on your salad.
Say no to soda. An average cup of soda can contain around 300 calories and 19 grams (0.67 oz) of sugar, and lemonade and other fruity drinks can also pack a lot of calories and sugar.[17] Order a glass of water or an unsweetened iced tea while dining at a buffet to minimize your calorie intake.

5
Harmonize your flavors. A meal made up of many different flavors may stimulate you appetite, causing you to eat more. Try to harmonize and simplify the flavors on your plate, which may help you feel full and satiated. For instance, instead of cheesy broccoli, salad with ranch dressing, and beef with red wine sauce, choose a salad with a citrus-based dressing and fish with lemon or a similar citrus marinade.[18]
Your food does not need to fit the same flavor profile from meal to meal — variety between lunch and dinner is great. Just try to keep the flavors within each meal simple and harmonious.

6
Pass on the waffle or pancake station at a breakfast buffet. Waffle and pancake stations are often found at hotel breakfast buffets. Although they are tasty, these sugary breakfast items can contain a lot of sugar and carbs with minimal nutritional value. Topping them off with 1 tablespoon or 15 milliliters (1 fl oz) of maple syrup can add an additional 52 calories.[19]
Opt for an egg-white omelet or a bowl of oatmeal to load up on protein and fiber that will fuel you throughout the day.
If you do wish to indulge but don’t want to consume all those calories and sugar, opt for a multi- or whole grain waffle or pancake and use a minimum amount of syrup.[20]

Can you make sausage gumbo????
May 11, 2017
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When it comes to classic Louisiana cuisine, it’s hard to top gumbo, a thick, hearty stew featuring richly flavored stock and meat or shellfish. Instead of the usual shrimp- or chicken-based gumbo, though, switching things up with sausage can be a new twist on the dish. By sauteing the pepper, celery, and onion that helps flavor the gumbo in the same pot that you cook the sausage, you layer the flavors throughout the dish for truly delicious stew. Serve your sausage gumbo over cooked rice, and you’ll have a dish that works well as a main course all on its own.

Ingredients
Edit
4 large andouille sausage links, sliced into ¾-inch (1.9-cm) ovals
3 tablespoons (43 g) unsalted butter
1 cup (175 g) chopped green bell pepper
1 cup (225 g) chopped celery
1 cup (150 g) chopped onion
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon (1 g) dried thyme
1 teaspoon (6 g) salt
¼ teaspoon (½ g) cayenne pepper
½ cup (63 g) all-purpose flour
1 14.5 ounce (411 g) can diced tomatoes
4 cups (946 ml) chicken broth
Prepared rice
Part One of Four:
Cooking the Sausage
Edit

1
Heat the butter. Add 3 tablespoons (43 g) of unsalted butter to a large Dutch oven or pot. Turn the heat to medium, and allow the butter to melt completely, which should take approximately 3 to 5 minutes.[1]
If you prefer, you can substitute olive oil or vegetable oil for the butter.

2
Add the sausage and cook for several minutes. Once the butter has fully melted, add 4 large andouille sausage links that have been sliced into ¾-inch (1.9-cm) ovals to the pot. Allow the sausage to cook until color and a light crust develops on all sides of the meat, which should take approximately 5 minutes.[2]
Be sure to stir the sausage constantly as it heats it to ensure that it cooks evenly.

3
Remove the sausage and set aside. When you’ve finished cooking the sausage, use a slotted spoon to remove it from the pot. Place it on paper towel-lined plate to absorb the excess grease, and set it aside.[3]
There is no need to wash or clean the pot after removing the sausage. You want the remaining butter and grease in it to flavor the gumbo as you move onto the other steps.
Add the pepper, celery, and onion and cook until tender. To the same pot that you cooked the sausage, add 1 cup (175 g) of chopped green bell pepper, 1 cup (225 g) of chopped celery, and 1 cup (150 g) of chopped onion. With the heat on medium, allow the vegetables to cook until they are tender, which should take approximately 4 to 5 minutes.[4]
If you find that the butter has cooked off after you’ve finished with the sausage, you can add 1 to 2 tablespoons (14 to 28 g) more before adding the vegetables.
Stir the vegetables periodically to ensure that they cook evenly.

2
Stir in the garlic and saute briefly. Once the vegetables are tender, add 4 cloves of minced garlic to the pot. Allow the mixture to cook for approximately 1 minute, or until the garlic becomes fragrant.[5]
If you prefer, you can substitute 1 teaspoon (3 g) of garlic powder for the minced garlic. Add it in the following step with the other dried spices.

3
Mix in the thyme, salt, and cayenne pepper and cook until fragrant. After you’ve cooked the garlic with the vegetables, add 1 teaspoon (1 g) of dried thyme, 1 teaspoon (6 g) of salt, and ¼ teaspoon (½ g) of cayenne pepper to the pot. Mix the spices in well, and allow the mixture to cook for 30 seconds.[6]
If you want your sausage gumbo to be spicier, you can add more of the cayenne pepper.
You can substitute 1 to 2 teaspoons (3 to 6 g) of Cajun seasoning for the the thyme, salt, and cayenne pepper. It is spice blend that contains all of those ingredients.
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Part Three of Four:
Creating the Broth
Edit

1
Stir in the flour until the mixture browns. After you’ve cooked the spices into the vegetable mixture, sprinkle ½ cup (63 g) of all-purpose flour into the pot. Stir well so all of the ingredients are coated with the flour, and turn the heat up to medium-high. Cook the mixture for approximately 1 minute, or until the flour browns.[7]

2
Add the tomatoes and cook for a couple of minutes. Once the flour has browned, add a 14.5 ounce (411 g) can of diced tomatoes to the pot. Allow the tomatoes to cook until they begin to release their juices, which should take approximately 2 minutes.[8]
Make sure to stir the mixture occasionally to ensure that it heats evenly.

3
Mix in the broth and bring the mixture to a boil. After the tomatoes have released their juices, add 4 cups (946 ml) of chicken broth to the pot. Stir it in well, and cover the pot. Turn the heat to high and allow the mixture to come to a boil, which should take approximately 5 minutes.[9]
It’s best to use low-sodium chicken broth because salt has already been added to the dish.
Return the sausage to the pan and reduce the heat. After the pot has come to a boil, add the cooked sausage to the mixture. Leave the lid off, and turn the heat down to medium.[10]
If the mixture is still boiling after you reduce the heat, you may need to lower the heat to medium-low or low.

2
Simmer the gumbo for approximately half an hour. When all of the ingredients are combined, let the gumbo simmer for 25 to 30 minutes. Stir the mixture occasionally to ensure that none of the ingredients stick to the pot.[11]
Simmering the gumbo helps thicken it up so it has more of a stew-like consistency. You can simmer it until it reaches the consistency that you like.

3
Serve the gumbo over rice. Once the gumbo has simmered for about half an hour, remove the pot from the heat. Pour the gumbo over individual bowls of prepared white or brown rice, and serve.[12]
You can add a dash or two of hot sauce to the bowls of gumbo and rice before you serve them if you like.
Store any leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator. It should keep for up to 3 days.
You can also freeze leftovers in an airtight container for up to 3 months.

4
Finished.

Easy ways to make a banana split… yumm yumm
May 11, 2017
1
Banana-Split-Parfait-Pin-

You can make a healthy banana split by swapping out a few ingredients and controlling your portion sizes. Use a small scoop of low-fat ice cream, frozen yogurt, or Greek-style yogurt instead giant scoops of regular ice cream. Swap unhealthy toppings out for nutritious options, like dried or fresh fruit and nuts. Try making interesting variations on the traditional banana split, like a healthy banana split parfait or fun frozen banana split bites.

Ingredients
Edit
Traditional Banana Split[1]
1 banana
A scoop of low-fat Greek style yogurt or frozen yogurt
Dried or fresh fruit, like raisins, dried cranberries, fresh strawberries, or blueberries
Chopped or sliced nuts, like walnuts or almonds
Healthy Banana Split Parfaits[2]
2 ounces (57 grams) semi-sweet chocolate chips
3 medium bananas, sliced
1/4 cup (60 mL) walnuts, finely chopped
1 cup (240 mL) pineapple, diced
4 scoops of strawberry ice cream, about 1/4 cup (60 mL) each
4 cherries, pitted
Banana Split Bites[3]
12 pineapple chunks
1 banana cut into bite-sized pieces
6 medium strawberries, cut in half
2.5 ounces (71 grams) dark chocolate
1 teaspoon coconut oil
Chopped nuts or shredded coconut (optional)
12 popsicle sticks
Method One of Three:
Making a Healthy Traditional Banana Split
Edit

1
Control your portion sizes. The first step to turning a banana split into a healthy snack is to use smaller portions. Instead of piling on three or four giant scoops of ice cream, limit yourself to a small scoop of lower-fat options. Use parfait glasses or mason jars instead of big bowls to help you keep your portion sizes in check.[4]

2
Swap ice cream with yogurt or frozen yogurt. For the healthiest option, use low-fat Greek style yogurt or whole milk yogurt. These offer more nutrients and less fat than ice cream, and contain healthy probiotics. Their thick and creamy textures are great substitutes for ice cream, so you won’t be missing out on richness.[5]
You can also substitute ice cream with a low-fat or high-protein brand, or use low-fat frozen yogurt.
Go for fresh and dried fruits, nuts, and other healthy toppings. Drowning your banana split in whipped cream, butterscotch, chocolate syrup, and other not so healthy toppings will send your calorie count soaring. Instead, you can splurge with a small amount of melted dark chocolate, and use nutritious, low-calorie fruits and nuts.[6]
Try sliced almonds, chopped peanuts, or a tablespoon of peanut butter.
Top your split with raisins, blueberries, diced pineapple, or sliced strawberries.

4
Turn your healthy banana split into a fun activity. A healthy banana split can be a fun, interactive activity for your kids, whether for dessert or an afterschool snack. Put out bowls of each topping, and try letting your younger kids serve themselves to practice using utensils and taking turns.[7]
If you’re an adult making a healthy snack for yourself, layering your banana split in a parfait glass or mason jar will add a touch of refinement to your dessert. In addition to keeping your portions in check, you’ll feel a little more fun and fancy.

5
Put together a beautiful banana split. Cut a banana in half then slice each half lengthwise, so you have four long slices. Place them at the bottom of a bowl or jar, and add a scoop of yogurt, frozen yogurt, or low-fat ice cream. Top it with sliced strawberries, fresh blueberries, diced pineapple, or chopped nuts.[8]
You might be cutting down on calories, but there’s no need to deprive yourself of a gorgeous, simple dessert!
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Method Two of Three:
Preparing Banana Split Parfaits
Edit

1
Melt the chocolate. Place the chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl. Microwave it for 30 seconds, then give it a stir. Continue to microwave it in 30 second intervals, stirring after each, until the chocolate is smooth and pourable.[9]
You can also melt the chocolate over low heat on the stovetop if you don’t want to use the microwave.
Toss the banana slices with the walnuts. Place the bananas and about 3/4 of the walnuts in a medium-sized bowl. Mix them together with your clean hands or rubber spatula. You can use a metal spoon, but be careful not to break the bananas.[10]
Your bananas should be about 1/4 inch (or about 1/2 centimeter) in thickness.

3
Assemble your parfaits in layers. Grab four small bowls or parfait glasses. First, place 1/4 cup (60 mL) of pineapple at the bottom of each bowl. Then divide the walnut-coated bananas evenly between them. Top each with a scoop of strawberry ice cream, drizzle with melted chocolate, and top with the rest of the walnuts and a cherry.[11]
You can substitute the strawberry ice cream with a low-fat variety, high protein ice cream, or frozen yogurt for healthier options.
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Method Three of Three:
Creating Healthy Banana Split Bites
Edit

1
Assemble the fruit onto popsicle sticks. Make stacks with one piece each of cut pineapple, banana, and strawberry. Press a popsicle stick through each stack. Place the fruit popsicles in an airtight container or freezer bag, and freeze them for one or two hours, or until they’re solid.[12]
For best results, use a banana that’s slightly unripe or just turning ripe. Your bites will eventually turn out mushy if your fruit, especially the banana, is too ripe.
Melt the chocolate and coconut oil. Place the coconut oil and chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl. Microwave for 30 seconds, stir, then repeat until the chocolate is completely melted. If you prefer to use a stovetop, heat the chocolate and oil over low heat and stir constantly.[13]
Start melting the chocolate when the fruit becomes solid. Remove the chocolate from heat once it’s melted.

3
Dip the fruit popsicles in the chocolate. Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper, so you’ll have somewhere to put your chocolate-dipped popsicles. Dip one side of each fruit stack into the melted chocolate, then let the excess drip. If you’re using chopped nuts or shredded coconut, immediately dip the chocolate-covered fruit popsicle into a bowl of the nut topping.[14]
After dipping, place each popsicle onto the parchment paper and let them rest until the chocolate hardens.

4
Freeze your banana split bites overnight. After the chocolate is completely hard, transfer the bites into an airtight container or freezer bag. Place them in the freezer overnight, and store them there until you’re ready to serve.[15]
If you pack a lunch with them or want to serve them at an outing, it’s a good idea to transport them with an ice pack to prevent a melted chocolate mess.
A healthy banana split parfait! Enjoy this skinny version of dessert for breakfast or dessert!

Some desserts are just fun. Banana splits are one of those. Have you ever been sad while looking at a banana split? I think it’s impossible. All those flavors and colors, it’s just a happy food. What makes me even happier than a banana split? A healthy banana split. Whoo hooo! These make me so happy. I think I may eat this every day for the rest of my life. Ok, ok, that might be a bit of hyperbole. But you get the idea, right?

Isn’t that cherry on top just gaaaahgeous?! Like that? That’s my exaggerated way of saying gorgeous..in case you were wondering what happened to my spell check. I’m slightly obsessed with these cherries. And I can tell you the hubs is probably happy that I am. It might be possible I asked him to drive me about 15 minutes out of the way (one way) to go to a certain store, just so I could get these exact cherries. Ok, so that’s exactly what happened. But I couldn’t be happier with how perfect they look sitting on that cup of delightfulness.

And sprinkles!!!! Be still my heart. A day with sprinkles is a good day indeed. I think that’s a famous quote or something. If not. It should be. Ok, enough about me rambling about cherries and sprinkles. You probably want me to get to the point and actually tell you what’s in these right? Lucky for you, I am! This just happens to be loaded with all good stuff. Vanilla Greek Yogurt, which I don’t know about you, but to me that stuff just tastes like cake. If you don’t think so, don’t burst my bubble by telling me otherwise please! I love me some vanilla yogurt. Top that with some granola, if you make your own you can add that, or I just picked some up pre-made from the market. Vanilla of course! And all of our fruits are in there, banana, strawberry, pineapple, oh my! Some more yogurt and a cherry on top. Ohhh the cherries! And it’s a healthy cherry too! Although I will admit that when I gave this to my lil mini monster (the 2 year old), I took the cherry and gave her a maraschino instead. C’mon. I didn’t want her to choke on the pit! Plus, she’s 2. Maraschino cherries are better than diamonds to a 2 year old.
This parfait could be enjoyed for breakfast or dessert! Who knew being healthy could be so fun?!

If you make this recipe make sure you take a picture and share it on Instagram with #houseofyumm ! I love seeing your creations! And follow me for more gaaaahgeous pictures of food.
Looking for healthy breakfast ideas? What about a banana split? for breakfast? YOU BET! Whip up this healthy, “clean-eating” version in about 5 min. and indulge guilt-free.

Sometimes it’s all about the presentation…just changing things up a bit can make something feel “new” and “special”. Case in point, today’s healthy breakfast banana split!

Healthy ingredients, like cottage cheese (or yogurt), fresh fruits and nuts that make up this banana split may already be part of your breakfast routine, but when you dress them up in a fun banana split bowl somehow, they just seem so decadent!

Preparing this banana split is so easy, even the kids can do it! You can use a special banana split bowl (mine came from Crate and Barrel) or any low shallow dish.

Cut a banana in half lengthwise and place in the dish. Add a layer of strawberries, blackberries or any of your favorite fruits between the banana slices. This helps to hold them up and forms the base of the banana split. Add a few scoops of cottage cheese (or your favorite yogurt) and top with fruit jelly (or even chocolate sauce if you like) granola and nuts.

It’s pretty hard to have a bad day when you start out with a fun ( and healthy) breakfast banana split!
INSTRUCTIONS
Peel 1 bananas and cut in half lengthwise. Place banana halves in a shallow bowl . Add a few berries to the bottom of the bowl, between banana slices. Top with cottage cheese and sprinkle with remaining berries, granola and chopped nuts. Repeat with remaining banana, to prepare second banana split. Serve immediately.
for a little extra sweetness drizzle with honey or agave.
This delicious but healthy banana split recipe is magic for your taste buds–and waistline–and perfect for making with your kids.

CUTE BANANA SPLIT BOWLS AND SPOONS

Real banana split bowls make a healthy banana split even more special. By clicking one of these links, we get a small commission on anything you buy from Amazon, without it costing you any extra. Thanks for supporting our family business!
HEALTHY BANANA SPLIT RECIPE KIDS CAN MAKE

They say breakfast is the most important meal of the day. No pressure, breakfast. You got this, right?

We wake up hungry, and are bombarded with choices–everything from bagels and sugar laden colorful cereals to donuts and toaster pastries.

They all promise to satisfy our tummies. That early morning sugar gives us an artificial energy boost to get lunch boxes in backpacks and shovel kids out the door.

We know it isn’t healthy. But we serve it anyway because we know they’ll eat it. It’s one less thing to worry about.

BUT LETS TURN A CORNER…

Staying ahead of the enticing commercial advertising can be a challenge, but we can arm ourselves. We’ll do it with other amazing looking food. Building this healthy banana split with your kids is a great way to combat the battle against high fructose corn syrup and artificial colors and flavors.
Use this fun banana split bowl to add to the ambiance. It’s all about presentation, people. When it feels fancy, it is fancy.

Bonus? It tastes really good!

A RECIPE FOR SUCCESS

The Greek yogurt is packed with protein, and the granola adds in flavorful fiber without a ton of sugar. This healthy banana split recipe will keep you full quite a bit longer than a bowl of sugary cereal. The vividly colored fresh fruit entices the eyes–feeding those chemical firings in your brain that beg for something beautiful and delicious. The natural sugars in the fruit will give a more desirable energy boost sans the guilt. It’s a winning combo.

And your kids will love putting these together.

I mean, look at this face. Is this the face of a deprived child forced to eat cardboard for breakfast? I think not.

That is the face of bliss right there, folks.

My mama heart is full–knowing I’m giving myself and my family a healthy, but decadent, start to the day.

WHEN TO SERVE THIS HEALTHY BANANA SPLIT

By all means, don’t stop at breakfast.

This healthy banana split recipe will even be a hit as a dessert. So many people are trying to avoid high-sugar desserts. They feel sabotaged when they don’t have healthier options at functions. You’ll please their pallets and their waistlines. Nobody will miss the 7-layer dark chocolate cake you made last year. (Ok, maybe that’s drawing the line. They might discuss fond memories of that one.)
Make this healthy banana split recipe as a dessert bar for your next birthday party–or summer social event at the park–by offering different yogurt flavors, fruit, nuts, coconut, etc.

The possibilities are endless!

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Healthy Banana Split Recipe
Prep Time
5 mins

There are so many variations to dressing these Healthy Banana Splits. Choosing different greek yogurt flavors, or different toppings such as coconut, crushed almonds, or dried apricots will provide many fun options. Serve for breakfast, dessert, or at birthday parties. From Food.com

Course: Breakfast
Servings: 1
Author: Diana Johnson
Ingredients
1 banana, peeled and split lengthwise down the middle
3/4 cup plain greek yogurt
1/4 cup raspberries
1/4 cup blueberries
1/2 cup granola
1 dollop real whipped cream
1 maraschino cherry
Instructions
Place banana in a bowl and top with the greek yogurt.

Spoon granola or cereal over the yogurt and sprinkle with berries.

Add a little chocolate or fruit topping syrup if serving for dessert.

Dollop a spoonful of whipped cream on top and garnish with a cherry.