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do you know,honesty is the best policy???
May 28, 2017
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“No man has a good enough memory to make a
successful liar.” -Abraham Lincoln
A life of simplicity can be defined as a life that
has removed all of the nonessentials. It is
marked by oneness. It is uncomplicated. As a
result, it is freeing. It allows our lives to be
focused on the things that are most important to
us.
Simplicity in life cannot be achieved without
honesty. Honesty can live without simplicity, but
simplicity cannot live without honesty. Consider
the fact that every time we are not truthful, we
create an alternate reality. And subsequently, we
are forced to live a life in both worlds: the true
one and the one we’ve created. On the other
hand, when we choose honesty in all aspects of
life including our marriage, our business, and
our relationships, we live the same life wherever
we are. Honesty leads to simplicity, but
dishonesty leads to duplicity – the exact
opposite.
Consider the other benefits of a honest lifestyle:
Closer friendships. Honesty and integrity
pave the way for greater intimacy. Your
friends love the “true you,” not the one
you’ve artificially created.
Higher quality friends. Honesty attracts
honesty. People who are trustworthy and
honest attract trustworthy and honest
friends. And those are the best friends to
have.
Trust. Honest people are trusted by
others.
Confidence. Honest people trust
themselves. Never underestimate the
life-changing power of the ability to trust
yourself.
Wellness – Honesty has been linked to
less colds, less fatigue, less depression,
and less anxiety.
Less stress – Dishonesty needs to be
maintained. Pretending to be something
you are not requires constant attention to
detail, even for the most experienced.
Honest people are better able to relax
because they are just being themselves
and naturally, feel better about
themselves and less overwhelmed.
Unfortunately, early in our life we learn that
dishonesty can have incredible short-term
benefits. It can get us out of trouble. It can get
us what we want. It can make it easier to please
the people around us. And all of us develop the
habit (albeit, to varying degrees.).
Living an honest life takes effort – especially at
the beginning. It requires a decision to pursue it
and some action steps to get it started. But
once it begins to gain momentum in your life
and you begin to realize its many benefits,
honesty will become easier and easier.
To get started, consider some of these essential
truths to living an honest life:
Character, integrity, and morality in your
life make honesty easier. When you
choose to live a life of character, you will
soon realize that you have nothing to
hide… and honesty is a much easier path
if you don’t have anything to hide. There
are countless aspects to this
point that pertain to our spouses, our
children, our bosses, and friends. Pursue
integrity in all of them.
Consider the long-term consequences of
a short-term gain. As I mentioned, one
of the reasons that we begin living
dishonestly in the first place is that the
short-term gains seem obvious.
Unfortunately, these short-term gains
have long-term consequences. We would
be wise to consider them and count the
whole cost of our decisions.
Living an honest life on the outside
requires you to live an honest life on the
inside. If you are going to be completely
honest with others, you’ve got to be
completely honest with yourself. If we
have hurts in our lives that we have been
denying, we need to acknowledge them,
admit them, and address them.
Sometimes, it’s the 2 and 3 letter words
that can be the toughest. When the
answer is yes, say “yes.” When the
answer is no, say “no.” Be dependable.
Follow through on your commitments.
And don’t commit to anything that you
don’t intend to complete.
Being honest is not the same as saying
everything we think. Just because
something is true does not mean that it
has to be said. One of the tougher points
of living an honest life is knowing when
to avoid conflict, when to address
conflict, and when to create conflict.

Benjamin Franklin had truly said the
saying of honesty is the best policy.
Honesty is considered as the backbone
of a successful and well-working
relationship. Being honest is very
important in the relationship because
no relationship can be successful
without trust. Being completely honest
in the life is somewhat tough but it
goes long way however being dishonest
is easy but covers very small and
painful path. Being a truthful person in
the family and society is like being
awarded all through the life by the
dear ones as well as nature. Honesty is
the tool of living a prestigious life
gifted by the God to the humanity.
Honesty gives us power to tackle any
bad circumstances in the life as people
around us trust us and be with us. May
be telling white lies give good feeling in
the starting however it may badly harm
at the end.
It has been proved from several years
that the saying ‘honesty is the best
policy’ has helped great people in
building empires by winning the trust
of its citizens. History tells us that
telling lie never become successful and
makes the circumstances worse. Some
people do not choose the way of truth
because of many reasons or they do not
have dare to live with honesty.
However some hard times of the life
make them realize the importance of
honesty. Telling lie may hold us in big
problems which we cannot bear, so we
should be honest and trustworthy in
our life.
Honesty is the best policy is a famous
saying said by the Benjamin Franklin.
Honesty is considered as the best tool
of success in the life and a famous
person said it as a backbone of the
successful relationship which has
capability to form a well developed
society. Without being honest in the
life, it becomes very tough to make
real and trustworthy friendship or love
bond with anyone. People who are
generally used of telling truth can be
able to build better relationships and
thus better world. Some people who do
not have dare of telling truth to their
dear ones, generally tell lie and face
bad situations of being dishonest. On
the other hand, saying truth helps in
strengthening our character and makes
us strong. So, being honest (especially
with family, friends and other loved
ones) helps us a lot in many ways all
through the life. Honesty is the most
effective tool of protecting the
relationships.
Telling lies just to save the situation
can make the condition more worse.
Saying truth always helps us to
strengthen the character as well as
bring confidence within us. There are
many bad and good situations in the
life and I think almost all of us have
been felt that telling truth to our dear
ones gives us relief and happiness. So,
according to this saying, being honest is
really being a good human being in the
life.

major causes of fatal accident on the road
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Road accident is a global tragedy with the ever-
rising trend. Almost every day, we hear the news
of the accident on the television, radio and internet.
Most people continue to negligent and ignore the
danger involved in their driving and so, these
accidents happen. This essay will discuss all the
possible causes and solution of the road accidents.
To begin with, carelessness is one of the major
cause of the road accident in our planet. Under
carelessness, we have various examples, which
include, using the mobile phone while the vehicle
in moving, break the traffic rules and entering from
the side road into the path of the vehicle.
Furthermore, when inexperience and untrained
drivers and those with blur eyesight that drive at
night is one of the major cause of escalating
accident rate in our world. In addition, most of the
people drive after drinking alcohol, which may lead
to dangerous road accident.
Issue that need to be considered in order to curb
accidents are policies made by government to
make sure that road are well constructed and
maintained. In addition, enforcement of appropriate
legislation to make sure that all commercial and
private drivers should be well trained before they
attain driving licence to drive on the street.
Furthermore, passenger should also be vigilant
enough to check drivers when they are over
speeding and driving under the influence of
alcohol. Police can play the pivotal role to
decrease the ratio of the accidents.
To sum up, there are many causes of the road
accidents in our world, with good strategies and
with the participation of the both government and
individual; we can easily overcome with this
potential problem.causes of road accident are as following:

1. Over speeding: Some road users have
formed the habit of over speeding each
time they are on the road. Some believe
in their ability to maneuver any difficult
situation on the road, while others
believe in their vehicles ability to riggle
out of any danger. But these perceptions
are not always correct. According to the
FRSC, 50% of road crashes in Nigeria are
due to over speeding. Motorists should
therefore know that over speeding kills.
2. Bad roads: The failure of successive
governments in Nigeria to fix the death
traps called roads in Nigeria has no
doubt caused so much pain to temporal
and frequent road users. The bad roads
across the nation are nothing to write
home about. Government at all levels
must be alive to their responsibilities to
make sure all roads in Nigeria are safe
and motorable. While road users should
also exercise caution when driving in
danger spots like potholes ridden
portions, dangerous bends, roads
threatened by erosion, roads enveloped
with darkness at nights e.t.c
3. Over loading: This offence is mostly
committed by commercial vehicles and
some haulage companies. Although some
private road users are also known to
over load their vehicles too such that it
endangers their lives because it makes
the driver of the vehicle uncomfortable,
puts the vehicle in distress and also
affects other road users.
4. Bad weather: Many road accidents were
due to unfavourable weather conditions
either ignored by the driver or unknown
to him/her. It is important for road users
to check the weather conditions of their
routes through the Nigerian
Meteorological Agency to be sure that
their intended routes and destination are
weather friendly. Driving in unfriendly
weather conditions can hamper smooth
driving and can cause damage.
5. Poor vehicle maintenance: Road users
must ensure that their vehicles are in
good condition before they hit the road.
This way, road crashes caused by badly
managed vehicles are avoided to the
barest minimum. All parts of the vehicle
must be checked and re-checked to
ensure the vehicle is in perfect condition
before embarking on any journey,
however short.
6. Bad driving habits: It is important for
road users to respect other road users be
ensuring their driving is not only for
their own safety, but for others. Adhering
to all traffic rules and regulations is also
very important for safe driving.
Indeed, road users’ behaviour has to
change dramatically. Ignorance, lack of
information and neglect on road safety in
Nigeria has now made many preventable
road carnages appear normal.
7. Fatigue: This is mostly common among
commercial drivers and drivers of Very
Important Personalities (VIPs) and
government officials. These drivers are
usually over worked and hardly observe
rest. It is important for principals of such
drivers to ensure that they observe
maximum rest always, so that they can
be refreshed and geared up for the next
journey.

the economic impact of hiv/aid
May 28, 2017
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HIV and AIDS affects economic growth by
reducing the availability of human capital. [1]
Without proper prevention , nutrition, health care
and medicine that is available in developing
countries, large numbers of people are falling
victim to AIDS.
People living with HIV/AIDS will not only be
unable to work, but will also require significant
medical care. The forecast is that this will
probably cause a collapse of babies and
societies in countries with a significant AIDS
population. In some heavily infected areas, the
epidemic has left behind many orphans cared
for by elderly grandparents. [2]
The increased mortality in this region will result
in a smaller skilled population and labor
force. [2] This smaller labor force will be
predominantly young people, with reduced
knowledge and work experience leading to
reduced productivity. An increase in workers’
time off to look after sick family members or for
sick leave will also lower productivity.
Increased mortality will also weaken the
mechanisms that generate human capital and
investment in people, through loss of income
and the death of parents. [2] As the epidemic
progresses, the age profile of those infected will
increase, though the peak is expected to stay
within the working age population. HIV
disproportionately infects and impacts on
women, so those sectors employing large
numbers of women e.g. education, may be
disproportionately economically impacted by
HIV [3]
Effect on taxable
population
By killing off mainly young adults, AIDS
seriously weakens the taxable population,
reducing the resources available for public
expenditures such as education and health
services not related to AIDS resulting in
increasing pressure for the state’s finances and
slower growth of the economy. This results in a
slower growth of the tax base, an effect that will
be reinforced if there are growing expenditures
on treating the sick, training (to replace sick
workers), sick pay and caring for AIDS orphans.
This is especially true if the sharp increase in
adult mortality shifts the responsibility and
blame from the family to the government in
caring for these orphans. [2]
On the level of the household, AIDS results in
both the loss of income and increased spending
on healthcare by the household. The income
effects of this led to spending reduction as well
as a substitution effect away from education
and towards healthcare and funeral spending. A
study in Côte d’Ivoire showed that households
with an HIV/AIDS patient spent twice as much
on medical expenses as other households. [4]
With economic stimulus from the government,
however, HIV/AIDS can be fought through the
economy. With some money, HIV/AIDS patients
will have to worry less about getting enough
food and shelter and more about fighting their
disease. However, if economic conditions aren’t
good, a person with HIV/AIDS may decide to
become a sex trade worker to earn more
money. As a result, more people become
infected with HIV/AIDS.
Relationship to GDP
UNAIDS, WHO and the United Nations
Development Programme have documented a
correlation between the decreasing life
expectancies and the lowering of gross national
product in many African countries with
prevalence rates of 10% or more. Indeed, since
1992 predictions that AIDS would slow
economic growth in these countries have been
published. The degree of impact depended on
assumptions about the extent to which illness
would be funded by savings and who would be
infected. [4]
Conclusions reached from models of the growth
trajectories of 30 sub-Saharan economies over
the period 1990–2025 were that the economic
growth rates of these countries would be
between 0.56 and 1.47% lower. The impact on
gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was
less conclusive. However, in 2000, the rate of
growth of Africa’s per capita GDP was in fact
reduced by 0.7% per year from 1990–1997 with
a further 0.3% per year lower in countries also
affected by malaria.
The macroeconomic effects of HIV/AIDS in
Africa are substantial, and policies for
dealing with them may be controversial—
one is whether expensive antiretroviral
drugs should be targeted at economically
productive groups of people. The authors
review the evidence and consider how
economic theory can contribute to our
response to the pandemic
Three million people died from AIDS in
2001, making it the world’s fourth biggest
cause of death, after heart disease, stroke,
and acute lower respiratory infection.
Over 70% of the world’s 40 million people
living with HIV/AIDS are in Africa (table
1 ). Besides the human cost, HIV/AIDS is
having profound effects on Africa’s
economic development and hence its
ability to cope with the pandemic. While
the impact of HIV/AIDS on people has
been well documented, it has been much
more difficult to observe the pandemic’s
effects on the African economy as a whole
or to assess how it might affect Africa’s
future development. Nevertheless we
need to understand these broader
economic effects to form effective policy
responses.
Summary points
Economic research helps to estimate the
effects of HIV/AIDS on the African
economy and the cost effectiveness of
prevention and treatment programmes
Economic theory predicts that HIV/AIDS
reduces labour supply and productivity,
reduces exports, and increases imports
The pandemic has already reduced
average national economic growth rates
by 2-4% a year across Africa
Prevention and treatment programmes
and economic measures such as targeted
training in skills needed in key industries
will limit the economic effects of HIV/
AIDS
Table 1
Numbers of people (millions) worldwide
living with HIV or AIDS in 2001
Methods
We used economic theory to predict what
happens to economies faced with rapidly
increasing mortality and morbidity. We
reviewed empirical studies that have
attempted to quantify the macroeconomic
effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. We
found these studies by searching EconLit,
Medline, PubMed, Embase, science and
social science citation indexes, and key
websites (International AIDS Economic
Network, UNAIDS, the World Bank, and
the World Health Organization). We also
contacted key researchers, and we did a
secondary search of the bibliographies of
all the studies we found. Unfortunately
there have been few studies of the
macroeconomic implications of the HIV
pandemic and few economic evaluations
of interventions to combat the disease.
Economic effects
Reduced labour supply
The HIV/AIDS pandemic has an impact on
labour supply, through increased
mortality and morbidity. This is
compounded by loss of skills in key
sectors of the labour market. In South
Africa, for example, around 60% of the
mining workforce is aged between 30 and
44 years; in 15 years this is predicted to
fall to 10% (R Elias, University of
Botswana, personal communication, 2000)
(figure). In the South African healthcare
sector 20% of student nurses are HIV
positive.
Reduced labour productivity
The long period of illness associated with
AIDS reduces labour productivity. One
review reported that the annual costs
associated with sickness and reduced
productivity as a result of HIV/AIDS
ranged from $17 (£12; €19) per employee
in a Kenyan car manufacturing firm to
$300 in the Ugandan Railway
Corporation. These costs reduce
competitiveness and profits. Government
incomes also decline, as tax revenues fall,
and governments are pressured to
increase their spending, to deal with the
rising prevalence of AIDS, thereby
creating the potential for fiscal crises.
Reduced exports and increased imports
Lower domestic productivity reduces
exports, while imports of expensive
healthcare goods may increase. The
decline in export earnings will be severe
if strategic sectors of the economy are
affected, such as mining in South Africa.
Consequently the balance of payments
(between export earnings and import
expenditure) will come under pressure at
the same time that government budgets
come under pressure.

history of a great islamic scholar
May 28, 2017
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Usman dan Fodio , born Usuman ɓii
Foduye, (also referred to as Arabic : ﻋﺜﻤﺎﻥ ﺑﻦ
ﻓﻮﺩﻱ , Shaikh Usman Ibn Fodio, Shehu Uthman
Dan Fuduye, Shehu Usman dan Fodio or Shaikh
Uthman Ibn Fodio) (15 December 1754, Gobir –
20 April 1817, Sokoto ) [5] was a religious
teacher, writer and Islamic promoter, and the
founder of the Sokoto Caliphate. Dan Fodio was
one of a class of urbanized ethnic Fulani living
in the Hausa States in what is today northern
Nigeria . He was a leader who followed the
Sunni Maliki school of Jurisprudence and the
Qadiri branch of Sufism . [6] He is considered by
many Jad’s spiritual father.
A teacher of the Maliki school of law , he lived in
the city-state of Gobir until 1802 when,
motivated by his reformist ideas and suffering
increasing repression by local authorities, he
led his followers into exile. This exile began a
political and social revolution which spread from
Gobir throughout modern Nigeria and
Cameroon , and was echoed in a jihad
movement led by the Fula ethnic group across
West Africa. Dan Fodio declined much of the
pomp of rulership, and while developing
contacts with religious reformists and jihad
leaders across Africa, he soon passed actual
leader ship of the Sokoto state to his son,
Muhammed Bello.
Dan Fodio wrote more than a hundred books
concerning religion , government, culture , and
society . He developed a critique of existing
African Muslim elites for what he saw as their
greed, paganism, violation of the standards of
Sharia law, and use of heavy taxation. He
encouraged literacy and scholarship, for women
as well as men, and several of his daughters
emerged as scholars and writers. His writings
and sayings continue to be much quoted today,
and are often affectionately referred to as Shehu
in Nigeria. Some followers consider dan Fodio
to have been a mujaddid , a divinely inspired
“reformer of Islam”. [7]
Dan Fodio’s uprising was a major episode of a
movement described as the Fulani hegemonies
in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth
centuries. [8] It followed the jihads successfully
waged in Futa Bundu, Futa Tooro, and Fouta
Djallon between 1650 and 1750, which led to
the creation of those three Islamic states. In his
turn, Shehu inspired a number of later West
African jihads, including those of Seku Amadu ,
founder of the Masina Empire, El Hadj Umar
Tall , founder of the Toucouleur Empire (who
married one of dan Fodio’s granddaughters),
and Modibo Adama, founder of the Adamawa
Emirate .
Early life and training
Dan Fodio was of Fulani descent. [9] He was
well educated in classical Islamic science,
philosophy, and theology. He also became a
revered religious thinker. His teacher, Jibril ibn
‘Umar, argued that it was the duty and within
the power of religious movements to establish
an ideal society free from oppression and vice.
Jibril was a North African Muslim alim who
gave his apprentice a broader perspective of
Muslim reformist ideas in other parts of the
Muslim world. Dan Fodio used his influence to
secure approval for creating a religious
community in his hometown of Degel that
would, dan Fodio hoped, be a model town. He
stayed there for twenty years, writing, teaching,
and preaching.
In 1802, Yunfa, the ruler of Gobir and one of dan
Fodio’s students, turned against him, revoking
Degel’s autonomy and attempting to
assassinate dan Fodio. Dan Fodio and his
followers fled into the western grasslands of
Gudu , where they turned for help to the local
Fulani nomads. In his book Tanbih al-ikhwan
’ala ahwal al-Sudan (“ Concerning the
Government of Our Country and Neighboring
Countries in the Sudan ”) Usman wrote: “The
government of a country is the government of
its king without question. If the king is a
Muslim, his land is Muslim; if he is an
unbeliever, his land is a land of unbelievers. In
these circumstances it is obligatory for anyone
to leave it for another country”. [10] Usman did
exactly this when he left Gobir in 1802. Yunfa
then turned for aid to the other leaders of the
Hausa emirate. Sokoto Caliphate (Fulani Empire) in the 19th
century, established after Fulani Jihad
The Fulani Jihad of 1804–1808, also known as
the Fulani War or Jihad of Usman dan Fodio,
was a military contest in present-day Nigeria
and Cameroon. The war began when Usman
dan Fodio, a prominent Islamic scholar and
teacher, was exiled from Gobir by the king
Yunfa , one of his former students.
Usman dan Fodio assembled a Fulani army to
lead in jihad against the Hausa kingdoms of the
north of Nigeria. The forces of Usman dan Fodio
slowly took over more and more of the Hausa
kingdoms, capturing Gobir in 1808 and
executing Yunfa. The war resulted in the
creation of the Sokoto Caliphate, headed by
Usman dan Fodio, which became one of the
largest states in Africa in the 19th century. His
success inspired similar jihads in Western
Africa.
Background
The Kanem-Bornu Empire had been in decline
in the area from the mid-18th century. The
result was the rise of a number of independent
Hausa kingdoms throughout the region. Two
prominent Hausa kingdoms were Gobir and
Zamfara . However, warfare between the Hausa
states and with other states were constant for
the latter 18th century, resulting in a harsh
system of conscription and taxation. [1] The
Fulani, a largely pastoral people, were often the
victims of Hausa taxation, land control, and
other discriminatory practices. [2]
Lead up to war
Usman dan Fodio, born in 1751, joined a
growing number of traveling Islamic scholars
through the Hausa kingdoms in the 1770s and
became quite popular in the 1790s. [1]
Originally, dan Fodio’s preaching received the
support of the leadership of Gobir ; however, as
his influence increased and as he began to
advocate for self-defense arming by his
followers, his favor with the leadership
decreased. Sarkin Gobir Nafata, the king of
Gobir, placed a series of restrictions on dan
Fodio’s preaching. [1] In 1801, Sarkin Gobir
Yunfa , a former pupil of dan Fodio, replaced
Nafata as king of Gobir. However, Yunfa
increased the restrictions on dan Fodio and
exiled him from Gobir to the village of Degel . A
crisis developed later in 1803 when Yunfa
attacked and captured many of the followers of
a group associated with dan Fodio. Yunfa then
marched the prisoners through Degel, enraging
many of dan Fodio’s followers, who attacked the
army and freed the prisoners. Yunfa gave dan
Fodio the option of exile before destroying
Degel, which led to the large-scale hijra of dan
Fodio’s community to Gudu . So many people
went with dan Fodio throughout the state that
on February 21, 1804, Yunfa declared war on
dan Fodio and threatened punishment to anyone
joining him. [1] Followers of dan Fodio declared
him to be the Amir al-Mu’minin , commander of
the faithful, and denounced their allegiance to
Gobir.
Battles
Several minor skirmishes preceded the forces
meeting at the Battle of Tsuntua . Although Yunfa
was victorious and dan Fodio lost a number of
men, the battle did not diminish his force. He
retaliated by capturing the village of Matankari ,
which resulted in the battle of Tafkin Kwattoa, a
major action between Yunfa and dan Fodio’s
forces. Although outnumbered, dan Fodio’s
troops were able to prevent Yunfa from
advancing on Gunu and thus convince larger
numbers of people to join his forces. [1]
In 1805, the forces of dan Fodio, the jihadists,
captured the Hausa kingdom of Kebbi. By 1807,
the jihadists had taken over the states of
Katsina and Daura, and the important kingdom
of Kano. In 1808, the jihadists captured Gobir,
killing Yunfa in the battle. [1]
With the capture of Gobir, the jihadists saw that
they were part of a wider regional struggle.
They continued with battles against a number of
Hausa kingdoms, and the Sokoto Caliphate
expanded over the next two years. The last
major expansion of the jihadists was the
toppling of the Sayfawa dynasty in 1846. [1]
Founding of the Sokoto
Caliphate
Muhammed Bello, the son of Usman dan Fodio,
transformed the semi-permanent camp of
Sokoto into a city

history of Nigeria senate president
May 26, 2017
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Senator (Dr.) Abubakar Bukola Saraki, Senator
of Kwara Central, has experienced great
success in both the private sector and public
service of Nigeria.
Born on 19 December 1962, Senator Saraki
was educated in both Nigeria and the UK,
qualified and practiced as a medical doctor at
Rush Green Hospital in London. A young Dr.
Saraki decided to return to Nigeria in 1989
where he worked in the financial sector for
nearly a decade until he rose to the position of
Executive Director where he oversaw corporate
development and expansion programmes within
the financial industry.
In recognition of his experience and
professionalism, the Federal Government of
Nigeria appointed him as Special Assistant to
the President on Budget in 2000 where he was
responsible for preparing the 2000/2001
National Budget. Dr. Saraki equally initiated the
Fiscal Responsibility Bill and served on the
Economic Policy Co-ordination Committee,
where he was responsible for the formulation
and implementation of key economic policies
for Nigeria.
With a vision to translate his experiences into
progress and development for the people of his
home state, Dr. Saraki was called upon by his
people to contest for the position of Executive
Governor of Kwara State. He was elected and
sworn into office in 2003. Based on his
performances and achievements witnessed by
his people, and in demonstration of their
overwhelming support for him, the people of
Kwara State re-elected him in 2007 general
election for second term in office. As Governor,
Dr. Saraki garnered national and international
acclaim for his innovative approaches to
agriculture, health, education, fiscal policy and
environmental reforms. His spirit of team work
endeared him to his colleagues where he was
appointed as Chairman of the Nigeria
Governors Forum. In that capacity, he
championed a peer review mechanism among
the Governors of Nigerian states. He also used
the platform to create a harmonious working
relationship between the executive and the
legislative arm of government at the national
level. He was the first Nigerian Governor to be
awarded the National Honor of Commander of
the Order of the Niger (CON). As a man of the
people coupled with his level of achievements
in the political arena, he was conferred and
turbaned as a nobleman of high rank with a
traditional title of Turaki of Ilorin Emirate.
His transformational programs have been
praised and emulated within and outside
Nigeria, such as his community health
insurance scheme, environmental ‘Clean and
Green’ scheme, agricultural transformation by
turning Kwara State from a net importer to a
net exporter of food through the Zimbabwean
farmer’s project. Senator Saraki has worked
tirelessly to bring progress and greater
opportunity to Kwara State and the nation as a
whole.
In furtherance of his passion to serve the
people of Kwara State and in particular, Kwara
Central Senatorial District where he hails from.
Dr. Bukola Saraki was elected as a Senator in
2001 with overwhelming electoral votes. On his
assumption as a Senator of the Federal
Republic of Nigeria, he was appointed as the
Chairman, Senate Committee on Environment
and Ecology. His legislative interest also
includes the area of Health, Agriculture,
Education, National economy and
Environmental policy. Senator Saraki is also a
member of the Senate Committees on Capital
markets and Finance.
Out of his vision to ensure good governance,
Senator Saraki sponsored a motion on the floor
of the Senate on the need to end the fuel
subsidy regime in Nigeria which has been a
source of conduit pipe and wastages of national
resources. Amongst other motions and private
member bills, he has sponsored includes: the
National Oil Spill Detection and Response
Agency Amendment Bill 2012 which is aimed at
putting a halt to oil spills in the Niger Delta, the
Gas Flaring Prohibition Bill 2012, and a strong
supporter of the Climate Change Commission
Bill 2013.
As the Senate Committee Chairman on
Environment and Ecology, ubukola Abubakar “Bukola” Saraki (born
December 19, 1962) is a Nigerian politician who
has been President of the Senate of Nigeria
since 2015. Previously he was Governor of
Kwara State from 2003 to 2011. He was first
elected to the Senate in April 2011, representing
the Kwara Central senatorial district, and re-
elected in the March 2015 elections.
He is a current member of the All Progressives
Congress (APC) and previous member of the
People’s Democratic Party (PDP).
Early life and education
Abubakar Bukola Saraki was born on 19
December 1962 to the family of Olusola Saraki,
a senator (1979–1983) and a one time Senate
Leader of the Federal Republic of Nigeria and
his mother Florence Morenike Saraki. He
attended King’s College, Lagos , from 1973 to
1978, and Cheltenham College, Cheltenham ,
London from 1979 to 1981 for his High School
Certificate. He then studied at the London
Hospital Medical College of the University of
London from 1982 to 1987, when he obtained
his M.B.B.S (London).
Career
He worked as a medical officer at Rush Green
Hospital , Essex , from 1988 to 1989. He was a
director of Société Générale Bank (Nig) Ltd from
1990 to 2000. [1]
In 2000, President Olusegun Obasanjo
appointed Saraki as Special Assistant to the
President on Budget. [2] During his tenure,
Saraki initiated the Fiscal Responsibility Bill.
Saraki also served on the Economic Policy
Coordination Committee, where he was
responsible for the formulation and
implementation of several key economic
policies for Nigeria.
Governor of Kwara State
In 2003, he ran for the office of governor of
Kwara State on the platform of the People’s
Democratic Party (PDP) , and won. He was
sworn into office in May 2003. He ran again for
re-election in 2007 and won his second term.
As governor of Kwara, he led reforms in
agriculture, health, education, finance and
environment policy. One of his major
achievements was inviting displaced white
farmers from Zimbabwe to Kwara State and
offering them an opportunity to farm. This led
to the establishment of Shonga Farms
programme, which is now being replicated
across Nigeria. His charisma among his fellow
governors got him appointed chairman of the
Nigeria Governors Forum.
Power generation and electricity
Under Saraki, Kwara became the first state to
complete the Nigeria Independent Power
Project. In collaboration with the Power Holding
Company of Nigeria , Saraki re-energised the
Ganmo Power Station at Ilorin, and connected
over 375 rural communities to the national grid
through the development and installation of 725
transformers and 7 substations. [3] Kwara also
completed 4 electrification projects which meant
power became stable 18–22 hours a day. 90%
of people living in Kwara have access to
electricity, compared to a national average in
Nigeria of 30%. [4]
Primary health care
While in office, Saraki introduced new health
programmes, including a statewide campaign in
2008 to reduce maternal and child mortality
from malaria. This included distribution of
insecticide-treated nets and free malaria drugs
to pregnant mothers and to children under the
age of five. [5] A statewide programme of
hospital development was also implemented,
leading to the redevelopment of hospitals in
Afon , Patigi and Lafiagi. Other measures
included improved training and re-training for
medical staff; refurbishment of hospitals and
staff living quarters; and employment of
qualified medical doctors and other health
workers. Many of the primary care programmes
were sponsored by international agencies such
as WHO and UNICEF . [6]
Agriculture and farming
Saraki introduced agricultural policy reforms to
increase the commercial viability of farming, and
also the volume of exports to international
markets. The New Nigerian Farmers Initiative
was designed to improve the technical
capability of farmers and to ensure farmers had
a significant financial stake in new investment in
agriculture. The scheme utilised the under-used
agricultural expertise in the Zimba

welcoming of the most important month!!!!!
May 26, 2017
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The month of Ramadan holds a special place in
Islam and among Muslims because of two major
reasons:
Firstly, the book of eternal guidance the Holy
Quran was revealed upon Prophet Muhammad
(PBUH) in this month.
Secondly, the 30days of fasting in this month
lead to the glorious and auspicious occasion of Eid
ul Fitr for Muslims.
Observance:
The month is given great importance by Muslims
and Muslims in each part of the world welcome
and observe this month with all the reverence,
prestige and dedication it deserves. The mosques
are filled with people, the recitation of Quran takes
place and people become charitable. In this month
Muslims make special preparations to ask of
forgiveness from Allah Almighty and plead for His
blessings and mercy.Ramadan?
Find the dates for Ramadan 2014 in the multifaith
calendar
What is Ramadan?
Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic
calendar, when Muslims fast during daylight hours.
There are several reasons why Ramadan is
considered important:
The Qur’an was first revealed during this month
The gates of Heaven are open
The gates of Hell are closed and the devils are
chained up in Hell.
The Qur’an revealed
The month of Ramadan in which was revealed the
Qur’an, a guidance for mankind and clear proofs
for the guidance and the criterion (between right
and wrong)
[al-Baqarah 2:185]
The actual night that the Qur’an was revealed to
the Prophet Muhammad is called Lailat ul Qadr,
and to stand in prayer on this one night is said to
be better than a thousand months of worship.
Ramadan is often called ‘month of the Qur’an’
because of this, and Muslims attempt to recite as
much of the Qur’an as they can during the month.
Most mosques will recite one thirtieth of the Qur’an
each night during the Taraweeh prayers.
No one knows on which particular night the Qur’an
was first revealed, but it is said to be one of the
last ten nights of Ramadan.
The gates of Heaven are open and the gates of Hell
are closed
It was narrated from Abu Hurayrah (may Allah be
pleased with him) that the Messenger of Allah
(peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) said:
“When Ramadan comes, the gates of Paradise are
opened and the gates of Hell are closed, and the
devils are put in chains.”
(Agreed upon)
Muslims believe that their good actions bring a
greater reward during this month than at any other
time of year, because this month has been blessed
by Allah.
They also believe that it is easier to do good in
this month because the devils have been chained
in Hell, and so can’t tempt believers. This doesn’t
mean that Muslims will not behave badly, but that
any evil that they do comes from within
themselves, without additional encouragement from
Satan.
Almost all Muslims try to give up bad habits
during Ramadan, and some will try to become
better Muslims by praying more or reading the
Qur’an.
Muslims believe that this is one way that the
chaining up of the devils is manifested, since there
is no other reason for them to do so.
Top
Special practices
There are a number of special practices which are
only done during Ramadan.
Fasting the whole month long
Although Muslims fast during other times of the
year, Ramadan is the only time when fasting, or
sawm , is obligatory during the entire month for
every able Muslim.
Ramadan is intended to increase self-control in all
areas, including food, sleeping, sex and the use of
time.
Taraweeh Prayers
These are long night prayers, which are not
obligatory, but highly recommended.
Mosques are filled with worshippers who go to
attend these prayers, which usually last for one
and a half to two hours.
These prayers also give Muslims a chance to meet
at the mosque every day, and so they also help to
improve relationships in the Muslim community.
I’tikaf
I’tikaf refers to going into seclusion during the last
ten nights of Ramadan, in order to seek Lailat ul
Qadr by praying and reading the Qur’an. Some
people live in the mosque during this time for
serious reflection and worship. Others spend a few
hours at the mosque or home.
Top
The date of Ramadan
Find the dates for Ramadan 2014 in the multifaith
calendar
Confusion
Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic
calendar and as with all months in the Islamic
calendar, its start is based on the sighting of the
new moon.
There can be confusion and disagreement over the
starting date of this month. Since the month is full
of blessings and marks the beginning of fasting, or
sawm , accuracy is very important.
Since Muslims live all over the world, but Islam
started in what is now known as Saudi Arabia, they
may not agree as to which country’s first moon
sighting marks the start of the month.
But although Muslims do often start and end
Ramadan on slightly different days, there is little
real ill.

Life history of Nigerian president,Muhammadu Buhari
May 20, 2017
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Muhammadu Buhari was born on December 17,
1942, in Daura, Katsina State, to his father Adamu
and his mother, Zulaihat. He’s the twenty-third
child of his father. Buhari was raised by his mom,
after his father died.
General Muhammadu Buhari is one of the most
notorious figures in Nigeria because of his past.
Even though he is most widely recognized for
being Head of State of Nigeria between 1983 and
1985, this has been long ago and since then he
has changed significantly.
Now General Mohammed Buhari is a new man that
ran for president once again. However, unlike the
last times when his efforts proved to be generally
unsuccessful, this time Muhammadu Buhari finally
managed to achieve his dream and be elected as a
president of Nigeria through a public vote.
According to the schedule, he will take office on
the 29th of May 2015. This is the first time since
Nigeria gained independence in 1960 that an
incumbent elected government will peacefully
transfer its power to an elected member of the
opposition. This just shows how much the times
have changed for the country and for this person.
The 29th of May will truly be a historical date for
Nigeria that one day might even be celebrated as a
national holiday. Nobody knows what the future
holds for this man and the whole country.
If you are interested in this intriguing person that isvision, April 1967 to July 1967.
Northern counter-coup of 28 July
1966
In July 1966 Lieutenant Muhammadu Buhari
was one of the participants in the “July
Rematch” or so called “Counter-Coup” , led by
Lt-Col Murtala Muhammed , that overthrew and
assassinated Nigeria’s first self-appointed
military Head of State General Aguiyi Ironsi , who
had assumed leadership of the Nigerian
government after a failed coup attempt on 15
January 1966 , which overthrew the elected
parliamentary government of Nigeria (also
known as first republic). Other participants in
the coup on 28 July 1966 included 2nd
Lieutenant Sani Abacha, Lieutenant Ibrahim
Babangida, Major Theophilus Danjuma ,
Lieutenant Ibrahim Bako among others. The
coup was a reaction to the January coup where
a group of mostly Igbo officers led by Major
Chukwuma Kaduna Nzeogwu overthrew the
democratically elected government of Prime
Minister Abubakar Tafawa Balewa . Many
Northern soldiers were aggrieved by the murder
of senior politicians, Prime Minister Abubakar
Tafawa Balewa , northern regional premier,
Ahmadu Bello, and four senior officers from
northern Nigeria: Brigadier Zakariya Maimalari,
Colonel Kur Mohammed, Lt-Cols Abogo
Largema and James Pam. [16] The counter-
coup was very bloody leading to the murder of
mostly Igbo officers. Among the casualties were
the first military head of state General Aguiyi
Ironsi and Lt Colonel Adekunle Fajuyi , the
military governor of the Western Region.
Civil war
Buhari was assigned to the 1st Division under
the command of Lt. Col Mohammed Shuwa , [17]
the division had temporarily moved from
Kaduna to Makurdi at the onset of the Nigerian
Civil War . The 1st division was divided into
sectors and then battalions [18] with Shuwa
assisted by sector commanders Martin Adamu
and Sule Apollo who was later replaced by
Theophilus Danjuma . Buhari’s initial assignment
was as Adjutant and Company Commander 2
battalion unit, Second Sector Infantry of the 1st
Division. The 2 battalion was one of the units
that participated in the first actions of the war,
they started from Gakem near Afikpo and moved
towards Ogoja with support from Gado Nasko’s
artillery squad. [19] They reached and captured
Ogoja within a week with the intention of
advancing through the flanks to Enugu, the rebel
capital. [20] Buhari was briefly the 2 battalion’s
Commander and led the battalion to Afikpo to
link with the 3rd Marine Commando and
advance towards Enugu through Nkalagu and
Abakaliki . However, before the move to Enugu,
he was posted to Nsukka as Brigade Major of
the 3rd Infantry Brigade under Joshua Gin who
would later become battle fatigued and replaced
by Isa Bukar. [21] Buhari stayed with the infantry
for a few months has the Nigerian army began
to adjust tactics learnt from early battle
experiences. Instead of swift advances, the new
tactics involved securing and holding on to the
lines of communications and using captured
towns as training ground to train new recruits
brought in from the army depots in Abeokuta
and Zaria. [21] In 1968, he was posted to the 4
Sector also called the Awka sector which was
charged to take over the capture of Onitsha
from Division 2. The sector’s operations was
within the Awka- Abagana-Onitsha region which
was important to Biafran forces because it was
a major source of food supply. It was in the
sector that Buhari’s group suffered a lot of
casualties trying to protect food supplies route
of the rebels along Oji River and Abagana. [22]
After the war
From 1970 to 1971, Buhari was Brigade Major/
Commandant, Thirty-first Infantry Brigade. He
then served as the Assistant Adjutant-General,
First Infantry Division Headquarters, from 1971
to 1972. He also attended the Defence Services
Staff College, Wellington, India, in 1973. [23]
From 1974 to 1975 Buhari was Acting Director
of Transport and Supply at the Nigerian Army
Corps of Supply and Transport
Headquarters. [24]
Buhari’s participation in July
1975 coup
Then Lieutenant Colonel Buhari was among a
Muhammadu Buhari, now you can read the
Muhammadu Buhari biography which is made
available to NaijaGists.com .
There is a lot of new information in there, and as a
matter of fact you will find much more than you
think. Even the Muhammadu Buhari Wikipedia page
has some very significant facts that have been
missed out, however, this biography aims to tell
the full story of the general that was once a Head
of State and is now going to be the next Nigerian
president. It is a must read for all people
interested in Nigerian politics.
Muhammadu Buhari Writes Nigerians, States
Covenant
Previously few months that I’ve travelled spherical
this country on campaigns, I’ve skilled the sheer
great thing about our diversity. From Port Harcourt
to Kano, from Abeokuta to Gusau, I experienced
first-hand the everyday sufferings and struggles of
our folks. I also experienced the overwhelming
need of our folks for change.
After I arrived in Port Harcourt on the 5th of
January to start out my campaigns, I was met by
our teeming supporters, who stayed till late in the
night to welcome us. Amongst them were many
younger men and women, who within the few
minutes that I shared with them on the airport,
made me to mirror on what kind of future awaits
them in our nation.
Current an in depth strategy for protecting the
fundamental rights and freedoms provided for in
our Constitution. There will probably be emphasis
on the rights of susceptible individuals together
with girls, youngsters and individuals dwelling with
disabilities in addition to access to justice and
prisons reforms.
Battle for you, and alongside you. We’ll struggle
collectively to defeat terrorism. But I can be
sincere with you about our challenges and I’ll bear
the duties of my cost. I cannot lie to you or
exaggerate our triumphs. My administration will be
completely clear in each step of our day by day
struggle and together we will win the struggle.
Healthcare in Nigeria is in crises. Too many
individuals don’t get any treatment. For those who
do get handled, all too often, the care they receive
is poor. Far too many die from easily treatable
diseases and what must be routine therapy
typically finish in loss of life. Moreover, Nigeria is
about to overlook our MDG targets. The statistics
communicate for themselves.
Embark on a program of mass mobilisation to
ensure that all children of college age, regardless
of the place they may reside in our country, and
no matter the social conditions of their mother and
father, are in school. Working in co-operation with
the State Governments, we shall make the required
investments in infrastructure, learning facilities.

the biography of a richest businessman in Africa
May 20, 2017
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Aliko Dangote GCON (born 10 April 1957) is a
Nigerian billionaire, [2] who owns the Dangote
Group , which has interests in commodities. The
company operates in Nigeria and other African
countries, including Benin, Ethiopia, Senegal,
Cameroon, Ghana, South Africa, Togo, Tanzania,
and Zambia. [3] As of February 2017, he had an
estimated net worth of US$12.5 billion. [2]
Dangote is ranked by Forbes magazine as the
67th richest person in the world and the richest
in Africa; [4] he peaked on the list as the 23rd
richest person in the world in 2014. [5] He
surpassed Saudi-Ethiopian billionaire
Mohammed Hussein Al Amoudi in 2013 by over
$2.6 billion to become the world’s richest
person of African descent. [6]
Early life
Dangote hails from a very prominent business
family that lived in Nigeria for many years. He
is the great grand son of Alhaji Alhassan
Dantata , the richest African at the time of his
death in 1955. Aliko Dangote, an ethnic Hausa
Muslim[7] from Kano State , was born on 10
April 1957 into a wealthy Muslim family. [8][9]
Dangote said, “I can remember when I was in
primary school, I would go and buy cartons of
sweets [sugar boxes] and I would start selling
them just to make money. I was so interested
in business, even at that time.” [10]
Business career
Business in Nigeria
The Dangote Group was established as a small
trading firm in 1977, the same year Dangote
relocated to Lagos to expand the company. [9]
Today, it is a multi-trillion naira conglomerate
with many of its operations in Benin, Ghana,
Nigeria, and Togo. Dangote has expanded to
cover food processing, cement manufacturing,
and freight. The Dangote Group also dominates
the sugar market in Nigeria and is a major
supplier to the country’s soft drink companies,
breweries, and confectioners. The Dangote
Group has moved from being a trading
company to being the largest industrial group in
Nigeria including Dangote Sugar Refinery,
Dangote Cement , and Dangote Flour.
In July 2012, Dangote approached the Nigerian
Ports Authorities to lease an abandoned piece
of land at the Apapa Port, which was
approved. [11] He later built facilities for his
flour company there. In the 1990s, he
approached the Central Bank of Nigeria with the
idea that it would be cheaper for the bank to
allow his transport company to manage their
fleet of staff buses, a proposal which was also
approved.
In Nigeria today, Dangote Group with its
dominance in the sugar market and refinery
business is the main supplier (70% of the
market) to the country’s soft drinks companies,
breweries and confectioners. [ citation needed ] It
is the largest refinery in Africa and the third
largest in the world, producing 800,000 tonnes
of sugar annually. Dangote Group owns salt
factories and flour mills and is a major importer
of rice, fish, pasta, cement and fertiliser. The
company exports cotton, cashew nuts, cocoa,
sesame seed and ginger to several countries. It
also has major investments in real estate,
banking, transport, textiles and oil and gas. The
company employs over 11,000 people and is
the largest industrial conglomerate in West
Africa.
Dangote has diversified into telecommunications
and has started building 14,000 kilometres of
fibre optic cables to supply the whole of Nigeria.
As a result, Dangote was honoured in January
2009 as the leading provider of employment in
the Nigerian construction industry.
He said, “Let me tell you this and I want to
really emphasize it…nothing is going to help
Nigeria like Nigerians bringing back their
money. If you give me $5 billion today, I will
invest everything here in Nigeria. Let us put our
heads together and work.” [12]
Other activities
Dangote played a prominent role in the funding
of Olusegun Obasanjo ‘s re-election bid in 2003,
to which he gave over N200 million (US$1M).
He contributed N50 million (US$0.25M) to the
National Mosque under the aegis of “Friends of
Obasanjo and Atiku”. He contributed N200
million to the Presidential Library. he book is titled – Aliko Dangote: The biography
of the richest black person in the world. And has
been accepted for publication by a publishing
company based in New York, USA will be
released to the market in June, 2012. This is the
first and only biography of this exceptional
Nigerian, and African. Written by Moshood
Ademola Fayemiwo and Margie Marie Neal.
Continue to read more about the book from the
publishers and more about the authors…
It is our pleasure to introduce to you the
biography of the richest black person in the world,
Aliko Mohammad Dangote. We were in Nigeria
for fourteen months for field work on this
important book. We visited the ancient city of
Kano in Northern Nigeria where Aliko was born,
Abuja, Lagos, Kaduna, Wudil and other important
places tracing the many paths of Aliko Dangote
and his successful career as Nigeria’s foremost
industrialist and Africa’s richest person.
You will agree with us that the achievement of
Mr. Dangote as the richest black person in the
world, according to the New York-based Forbes
magazine should be celebrated by all Africans
and the black race. In the book, we traced the
paternal family backgrounds of Mr. Dangote to
four generations beginning with Mr. Alhassan
Abdullah Dantata to Mr. Sanusi Dantata and Mrs.
Mariya Dantata-Dangote and Aliko Dangote. We
were able to secure rare photographs from the
family album in Kano, including the paternal
family of the richest black person in the world.
Our narrative included the political circumstances
that led to the death of Mr. Mohammad Dangote,
Aliko’s father in 1965 and the unrest ignited by
the removal of Mr. Mohammadu Sanusi, the Emir
of Kano and the grandfather of Dr Lamido Sanusi,
the current governor of the Central Bank of
Nigeria. We had rare interviews with many
Nigerians in Kano on how young Aliko grew up in
Kano and his formative years in the ancient city.
Next, we followed Aliko Dangote’s journey to
Lagos as a 15-year old young man under the
business wing of the late Mr. Usman Amaka
Dantata, Aliko’s uncle born in 1950 and the last
born of his maternal grandfather, who was the
younger brother of Aliko’s mother. We revealed
how Aliko Dangote had his first break in the
business world during the celebration of Festac’
77 and the first business relationship with then
35-year old Lt-Gen Olusegun Obasanjo and the
late Major-General Shehu Musa Yar’Adua. We
unearthed the secret of Mr. Dagote’s wealth
unknown to millions of people and his
contribution to the economic development of
Nigeria and Africa. In our book, we present the
“complete” Aliko Mohammad Dangote and his
private life; the actual number of children he has,
his wives and the many women in the life of the
richest black person in the world. For the first
time, we revealed the “secrets” of the business
success of Aliko Mohammad Dangote and draw
certain commonalities with other billionaires of
the world. Our searchlight did not escape the
philanthropic activities of Nigeria’s private
employer of labor as well, including his political
cum business connections with all Nigerian
leaders, beginning with Mr. Olusegun Obasanjo,
Shehu Shagari, the late Umaru Musa Yar’Adua
and the current Nigerian president, Mr. Goodluck
Jonathan.

does farmer has more benefits than doctor
May 20, 2017
0
A z

at a person’s value
depends on what they do for a living.
We are all equally important. I don’t
think I am “better than” anyone else,
but my life’s experiences give me a
unique perspective – just as do the life
experiences of everyone else.
BTW, I think I would have liked to be
a farmer – My Scandinavian
forefathers farmed in Sweden and
Norway, then moved to Kansas, where
they farmed for decades more. We all
have to make decisions about what
we do with our lives to benefit society
the most. Practicing medicine gave me
the opportunity to raise and educate
children who are all contributing to
the betterment of society as a whole –
probably not something I could have
accomplished while farming – but –
based on the experience I had with
my grandfather – it certainly seems
like a more serene lifestyle. (And –
although my father was an engineer
by trade, I could tell he was really
happy when we visited my my
grandfather and spent time fixing the
tractors, etc.)
Normally not a question I would
address, but your elitism seems to
have pushed my button today.
If you are interested in “No Nonsense”
answers to serious medical questions,
please follow me. (>200 answers on
cancer, medicine and human
behavior.)
14.2k Views · 21 Upvotes
Updated 30 May 2016
Gary
Larson Gary Larson, Medical
Director – Procure Proton
Therapy Center, OklahomaFarmers’ vs. Doctors?
Do you believe farmers are more important
than Doctors? Well, If you do not believe
you should. Farmers plant trees and grow
fruits whilst Doctors work in hospital to
save lives. Nonetheless they are both doing
the same job.
Firstly, It is believable to say that there are
farmers everywhere in the world and there
are also Doctors everywhere in the world
but why should they both be compared and
what do they have in common?
Farmers as we all know grow trees and
plant and these trees take in Carbon dioxide
(CO2) which reduces the carbon foot prints
for us humans in the world. Carbon dioxide
is produce by cars and it’s agreeable to say
that there are millions of cars in this world,
meaning there are a lot of CO2 being
produced daily, monthly year which isFarmers’ vs. Doctors?
Do you believe farmers are more important
than Doctors? Well, If you do not believe
you should. Farmers plant trees and grow
fruits whilst Doctors work in hospital to
save lives. Nonetheless they are both doing
the same job.
Firstly, It is believable to say that there are
farmers everywhere in the world and there
are also Doctors everywhere in the world
but why should they both be compared and
what do they have in common?
Farmers as we all know grow trees and
plant and these trees take in Carbon dioxide
(CO2) which reduces the carbon foot prints
for us humans in the world. Carbon dioxide
is produce by cars and it’s agreeable to say
that there are millions of cars in this world,
meaning there are a lot of CO2 being
produced daily, monthly year which isFarmers’ vs. Doctors?
Do you believe farmers are more important
than Doctors? Well, If you do not believe
you should. Farmers plant trees and grow
fruits whilst Doctors work in hospital to
save lives. Nonetheless they are both doing
the same job.
Firstly, It is believable to say that there are
farmers everywhere in the world and there
are also Doctors everywhere in the world
but why should they both be compared and
what do they have in common?
Farmers as we all know grow trees and
plant and these trees take in Carbon dioxide
(CO2) which reduces the carbon foot prints
for us humans in the world. Carbon dioxide
is produce by cars and it’s agreeable to say
that there are millions of cars in this world,
meaning there are a lot of CO2 being
produced daily, monthly year which isFarmers’ vs. Doctors?
Do you believe farmers are more important
than Doctors? Well, If you do not believe
you should. Farmers plant trees and grow
fruits whilst Doctors work in hospital to
save lives. Nonetheless they are both doing
the same job.
Firstly, It is believable to say that there are
farmers everywhere in the world and there
are also Doctors everywhere in the world
but why should they both be compared and
what do they have in common?
Farmers as we all know grow trees and
plant and these trees take in Carbon dioxide
(CO2) which reduces the carbon foot prints
for us humans in the world. Carbon dioxide
is produce by cars and it’s agreeable to say
that there are millions of cars in this world,
meaning there are a lot of CO2 being
produced daily, monthly year which is
endangering our lives more and more.
If you look at farmers from another
perspective, they are saving us, the
environments and our surroundings; they
are playing a role to protect us and by
these farmers are growing crops as well for
us to eat and grow. So it is right to say that
farmers and kind of doctors because a life
without trees in the world would be a
‘poisonous life’ for us and our next
generations to come.
Doctors on the other hands we need them
in our lives to make sure we are healthy and
to treat us when we are not healthy. Without
doctors a lot of people will be dead and
there will not be 7.6 billion people in the
world but about half that amount. Without
doctors there will be more tears in the
world (more people will be crying and
morning due to their relative dying), there
will be more fighting(people will be going
through extreme length and measures to get
drugs to heal themselves and others around
them) which could involve killing, bombing
and so on. So to conclude Doctors are
essential to our life and that is an
unchangeable fact. Period!
Finally, With all due respect to doctors,
Farmers are playing a stronger roll although
it does not seem so when compared to
doctors. The trees farmers’ plant helps the
whole world and everyone benefits from it
and when farmers do harvest, we all benefit
from the food which helps us nourish our
bodies. Doctors do help our lives so we
should be grateful to them but they are not
available all the time (24/7). On the other
hand cars will always be used around the
world and new & faster cars which will be
produced (more Carbon dioxide) and the
trees will always be there to ‘soak’ in and
absorb the C02 which helps us, daily
monthly, yearly. It’s also important for us
(humans) to remember that when trees are
burnt they are used as ‘fuels’ because we
are running out of fossil fuels and this helps
to keep our generations going.

does farmer has more benefits than doctor
May 20, 2017
0
A z

at a person’s value
depends on what they do for a living.
We are all equally important. I don’t
think I am “better than” anyone else,
but my life’s experiences give me a
unique perspective – just as do the life
experiences of everyone else.
BTW, I think I would have liked to be
a farmer – My Scandinavian
forefathers farmed in Sweden and
Norway, then moved to Kansas, where
they farmed for decades more. We all
have to make decisions about what
we do with our lives to benefit society
the most. Practicing medicine gave me
the opportunity to raise and educate
children who are all contributing to
the betterment of society as a whole –
probably not something I could have
accomplished while farming – but –
based on the experience I had with
my grandfather – it certainly seems
like a more serene lifestyle. (And –
although my father was an engineer
by trade, I could tell he was really
happy when we visited my my
grandfather and spent time fixing the
tractors, etc.)
Normally not a question I would
address, but your elitism seems to
have pushed my button today.
If you are interested in “No Nonsense”
answers to serious medical questions,
please follow me. (>200 answers on
cancer, medicine and human
behavior.)
14.2k Views · 21 Upvotes
Updated 30 May 2016
Gary
Larson Gary Larson, Medical
Director – Procure Proton
Therapy Center, OklahomaFarmers’ vs. Doctors?
Do you believe farmers are more important
than Doctors? Well, If you do not believe
you should. Farmers plant trees and grow
fruits whilst Doctors work in hospital to
save lives. Nonetheless they are both doing
the same job.
Firstly, It is believable to say that there are
farmers everywhere in the world and there
are also Doctors everywhere in the world
but why should they both be compared and
what do they have in common?
Farmers as we all know grow trees and
plant and these trees take in Carbon dioxide
(CO2) which reduces the carbon foot prints
for us humans in the world. Carbon dioxide
is produce by cars and it’s agreeable to say
that there are millions of cars in this world,
meaning there are a lot of CO2 being
produced daily, monthly year which isFarmers’ vs. Doctors?
Do you believe farmers are more important
than Doctors? Well, If you do not believe
you should. Farmers plant trees and grow
fruits whilst Doctors work in hospital to
save lives. Nonetheless they are both doing
the same job.
Firstly, It is believable to say that there are
farmers everywhere in the world and there
are also Doctors everywhere in the world
but why should they both be compared and
what do they have in common?
Farmers as we all know grow trees and
plant and these trees take in Carbon dioxide
(CO2) which reduces the carbon foot prints
for us humans in the world. Carbon dioxide
is produce by cars and it’s agreeable to say
that there are millions of cars in this world,
meaning there are a lot of CO2 being
produced daily, monthly year which isFarmers’ vs. Doctors?
Do you believe farmers are more important
than Doctors? Well, If you do not believe
you should. Farmers plant trees and grow
fruits whilst Doctors work in hospital to
save lives. Nonetheless they are both doing
the same job.
Firstly, It is believable to say that there are
farmers everywhere in the world and there
are also Doctors everywhere in the world
but why should they both be compared and
what do they have in common?
Farmers as we all know grow trees and
plant and these trees take in Carbon dioxide
(CO2) which reduces the carbon foot prints
for us humans in the world. Carbon dioxide
is produce by cars and it’s agreeable to say
that there are millions of cars in this world,
meaning there are a lot of CO2 being
produced daily, monthly year which isFarmers’ vs. Doctors?
Do you believe farmers are more important
than Doctors? Well, If you do not believe
you should. Farmers plant trees and grow
fruits whilst Doctors work in hospital to
save lives. Nonetheless they are both doing
the same job.
Firstly, It is believable to say that there are
farmers everywhere in the world and there
are also Doctors everywhere in the world
but why should they both be compared and
what do they have in common?
Farmers as we all know grow trees and
plant and these trees take in Carbon dioxide
(CO2) which reduces the carbon foot prints
for us humans in the world. Carbon dioxide
is produce by cars and it’s agreeable to say
that there are millions of cars in this world,
meaning there are a lot of CO2 being
produced daily, monthly year which is
endangering our lives more and more.
If you look at farmers from another
perspective, they are saving us, the
environments and our surroundings; they
are playing a role to protect us and by
these farmers are growing crops as well for
us to eat and grow. So it is right to say that
farmers and kind of doctors because a life
without trees in the world would be a
‘poisonous life’ for us and our next
generations to come.
Doctors on the other hands we need them
in our lives to make sure we are healthy and
to treat us when we are not healthy. Without
doctors a lot of people will be dead and
there will not be 7.6 billion people in the
world but about half that amount. Without
doctors there will be more tears in the
world (more people will be crying and
morning due to their relative dying), there
will be more fighting(people will be going
through extreme length and measures to get
drugs to heal themselves and others around
them) which could involve killing, bombing
and so on. So to conclude Doctors are
essential to our life and that is an
unchangeable fact. Period!
Finally, With all due respect to doctors,
Farmers are playing a stronger roll although
it does not seem so when compared to
doctors. The trees farmers’ plant helps the
whole world and everyone benefits from it
and when farmers do harvest, we all benefit
from the food which helps us nourish our
bodies. Doctors do help our lives so we
should be grateful to them but they are not
available all the time (24/7). On the other
hand cars will always be used around the
world and new & faster cars which will be
produced (more Carbon dioxide) and the
trees will always be there to ‘soak’ in and
absorb the C02 which helps us, daily
monthly, yearly. It’s also important for us
(humans) to remember that when trees are
burnt they are used as ‘fuels’ because we
are running out of fossil fuels and this helps
to keep our generations going.